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  5. "Chan eil sìde mhath anns an …

"Chan eil sìde mhath anns an Rìoghachd Aonaichte."

Translation:There is not good weather in the United Kingdom.

January 13, 2020

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nikhil3

Isn't "The weather is not good in the UK" also a valid answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

Your suggested answer would be a translation of the Gaelic, "Chan eil an t-sìde math anns an Rìoghachd Aonaichte."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kP62lSUN

But the English sentence doesn't sound like proper English. Wouldn't 'There is no good weather in the UK' be better?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatrionaH7

Surely the English translation should make sense? "There is not good weather..." is not something you would say in English...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ionnsaiche

Surely the English does make sense. "There is not good weather" is certainly something you would say in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaneLawson

Could this also translate as 'Weather is not good in the United Kingdom?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

I believe not. In "Chan eil sìde mhath…", the adjective mhath is attributive (i.e. there is not a linking verb between sìde and mhath. In your translation you are using good as a predicative adjective, linked to weather by the phrase is not. Predicative adjectives are not lenited in Gaelic (unless lenition is caused in some other way, e.g. a modifier such as glè or ro). Of course, lenition of attributive adjectives only occurs with feminine nouns, so the situation might not be so clear if sìde were replaced by a masculine noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reabhairean

That is a really awkward translation. It is unlikely anyone would express it in that manner.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/susan961004

After all we are learning Scottish Gaidhlig not english

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