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"In bibliotheca proxima tacite legere possum."

Translation:In the nearest library I can read quietly.

January 13, 2020

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomas.pyle

How do you read quietly? Or rather, how don't you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

If you read aloud (maybe reading to someone else), you make sound.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Passive voice? I'm confused. The endings look like the active ending for esse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidPNash

Not passive voice, just a slightly strange verb.

"possum" indeed conjugates much the same way as "sum", and a handy way to remember this is that a sensible English translation of its infinitive ("posse") is "to be able", with the stem "pot" or "pos" corresponding to "able":

"sum" = "I am"; "pos-sum" = "I am able"

"es" = "you are; "pot-es" = "you are able"

etc.

Even works nicely with infinitives in both languages:

"Ire potes" = "you are able to go."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emile_Bouwer

I thought "proxima" could mean "next/nearest" yet my answer "In the next library I can read quietly" was rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larry_Porter

"Proxima" does mean "nearest" or "next," but your wording creates a dangling context that implies you are already in one library that is noisy, and that you plan to move to another, quieter one--technically correct, but far-fetched. I got dinged for the opposite reason, for not creating enough context when I translated "proxima" as nearby, thinking of the English "proximate."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucretius6

This boils down to "proximus" already being a superlative form (of "prope" i.e. "near")..the "nearest" item is the same as the "next" one if you imagine having to go down a sequence of items


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emile_Bouwer

Thanks. That explanation helps.

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