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  5. "'S e ur beatha a sheanair."

"'S e ur beatha a sheanair."

Translation:You are welcome, grandfather.

January 13, 2020

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TamaraMoff4

Mods, there is no audio on this one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phimuliz

What's the difference between 's e ur beatha and 's e do bheatha? I can't work out the reasoning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ionnsaiche

"'S e do bheatha" is informal

"'S e ur beatha" is formal/polite and you use it here because it's someone much older than yourself


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

Almost. As with most European languages, GĂ idhlig has "T-V distinction".

'Do' relates to 'thu'; you/r singular, informal.

'Ur' relates to 'sibh'; you/r plural, singular formal.

Also note that 'do' lenites.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rosie142195

What is the direct translation? Does beatha mean life?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

Aye, it does. Literally, it is "It's your life". The history is obscure, but boils down to an Old Irish phrase wishing long life on the listener.

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