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  5. "Tha reòthadh ann an-dràsta."

"Tha reòthadh ann an-dràsta."

Translation:There is frost just now.

January 15, 2020

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmandaFlee1

I worked that out from the words available rather than being able to understand it from the recording. I wouldn't have got it otherwise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmandaFlee1

I heard something like gallon in the middle of it?? Phonetically: ha rohee gallon a drasta. Is that really the pronunciation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ionnsaiche

It's because of the pronunciation of reòthadh. The "-thadh" at the end tends to sound like "hug", but the degree is determined by the individual accent =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coiseam

yeah, i was trying to think what 'ghaoln' would mean :S


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coiseam

the recording is pretty hard to hear. this one probably needs re-done


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donnchadhMac

Sounds very like tha an reothadh to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

Ann means there --"there is frost." See the tips and notes, here: https://www.duolingo.com/skill/gd/Rain/tips-and-notes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TamaraMoff4

Why is there no "i" in this one? "Tha i reothadh ann an-drasta" is what I was expecting to write.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coiseam

the 'i' there is an 'it' referring to 'the weather that day',

so "tha i reòthanach an-drasta" would describe the weather.
"tha reothadh ann" just means 'there is frost'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiterallyAGoose

I believe you do not need "i" if the sentence includes "ann".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Extoria

I think because "ann" is a prepostional pronoun - it contains the "it" already


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cheech18

an-dràsta / a-nis, is there a difference? Certain circumstances where you would use one over another?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ionnsaiche

a-nis - now in the general sense, could mean today compared to yesterday

an-dràsta - now in the sense of "this minute"; you'll also see it as "just now"

Another expression is, an-dràsta fhèin. That is just a more intense version, it's like, "right now, this very second"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CalumMacLa

In my dictionary, the noun is spelt reothadh, no accent on the "o". The verb does have an accent on the "o"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donnchadhMac

Sounds very like tha an reothadh

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