"De todo eso, nada."

Translation:From all of that, nothing.

5 years ago

82 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gabor123
gabor123
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I do not even understand the english sentence. Could anyone explain what "From all of that, nothing" means?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

It describes putting a monumental effort into some enterprise and getting nothing in return.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/winmode
winmode
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This should be the #1 comment, explains the idiom great.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatousAc
MatousAc
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So why would "All of that for nothing" not work?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

"De" means from. Your close, but it is not a complete translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crisjordan22

You mean "you`re"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatousAc
MatousAc
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Oh, that's right. Thanks.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wdstout66
wdstout66
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*you're

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lambisqueiro

I am an English learner. Good explanation!

How do we translate this sentence into spanish?

Yo no sabia nada de todo eso

I did not know nothing from all of that?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Hi. It's "I did not know anything..." Otherwise it's a double negative, which doesn't sound good in English either. You translated it too well - word-for-word.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lambisqueiro

Ok, thanks!. ' the key is in ' any' as in : I did not have any money - Yo no tuve /tenía dinero I did not have anything of money- no tuve/ tenia nada de dinero. I have no money- no tengo dinero

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

OK, we will have to help each other now. I agree with "no tengo dinero" meaning "I don't have money". If I was asked to say "I don't have any money" in Spanish, I would say "no tengo ningún dinero". As for "yo no tuve dinero" that would be simply "I didn't have money".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lambisqueiro

Thanks! I suppose you can say: I do not have any money, I have no money and I do not have money. These are translated to Spanish as No tengo dinero or No tengo nada de dinero.( "nada" It is optional) You cannot say ningún dinero, ninguna sal..( Uncountable) you have to say nada de dinero, nada de sal. Or ningún libro ( countable).

Listen to this teacher:

http://webingles.com/some-any/

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Wow, that's perfect. Thanks for the link too, it's very interesting to see how the English words are learned and used from the Spanish point of view.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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"We have apples, oranges, and bananas. What would you like?"

"From all of that, nothing."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PitchPine1

i disagree with this. i think burke's got it right. i think it is an idiom used to express frustration. in fact, i'm going to commit this one to memory and use it at work.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatousAc
MatousAc
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It can mean either, but is probably not used as often in this latter way. (Example with fruit.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackbluthund

What a rude fruitarian

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SandipanMo1

I thought like that, and wrote "None of that". That was marked wrong too. It seems like there is something I don't understand here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caterine2008

From all the work I did, nothing was accomplished -- hence, "from all that, nothing"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesJ.
JamesJ.
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"And in the end, it doesnt even matterrrrr!" -Lincoln Park

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sapf05
sapf05
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RIP Chester!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SraHowe

Couldn't this sentence also mean, "Of all of that, nothing."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/louisrafael
louisrafael
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"of all of that, nothing" got marked right for me.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NadirBensaker

"for all that, nothing" wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Mine too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/countvlad
countvlad
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I agree, but got marked wrong for "of all that, nothing"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hfuhruhurr

I just put "of all that, nothing" and was marked correct. They must've updated the list of acceptable answers.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel_Thomas

I put the most natural English translation I could think of: "All of that for nothing". It didn't like it

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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This is not a translation but just a phrase you made from almost the same words. The meaning is different. I believe "All of that for nothing" would be "Todo eso para nada" or "Todo eso por nada".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daweshillroad

I agree with Daniel_Thomas. We don't have an english expression "of/from all of that, nothing" but we do have "all of that for nothing".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aliNka

Si. "Todo eso por nada".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

I suspect that your translation probably comes closest to the intended meaning. I can't think of what else "from all of that, nothing" might mean.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fergusrobertson

After all of that?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThePhillipWhite

This is a more comfortable idiomatic exchange

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/papabeartim

I wrote, After all that, nothing. It was marked incorrect.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kerifue

I do not even understand this in english, not to mention spanish! In what situation does this sentence makes sense?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PitchPine1

apply it to the wars against Iraq.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grippygecko

"Of all that, nothing" is not natural English usage. This kind of formation is only used by English speakers with links to other languages, e.g. Yiddish speakers. This meant that when I attempted to think of a natural English way to express this meaning: "nothing from all that." It was rejected.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PitchPine1

It sure as hell sounds like natural English to me. Especially if a person wants to sound like a Hemingway character.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

I would be more likely to say, "from all that nothing," but it sounds very natural. For example, if somebody told me a long story of how they rehabilitated a house and then were not able to make any profit, I might comment, "From all that, nothing?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grippygecko

I live in the UK. I think in the US there are more jews and Yiddish words are commonly understood by everyone even people who don't live in a city with a large population of Yiddish speakers. In the same way these types of Yinglish sentence constructions have become more mainstream in the USA. Where I live, the average person on the street would not say "From all that, nothing?" They might say "Nothing? after all that?". Well, I say "where I live" but really I live in a jewish area so they would, but...go a mile in any direction and they would not. They would not know what schlep, nudnick or schmate mean either though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

With radio, TV, and internet, it does not matter where you live you have so much access to everyone's regionalisms that they are no longer truly regionalisms. Even so, I know that if you say that you are going to "knock up" a girl you mean knock on her door or at least introduce yourself. Also, you probably know that if "I knocked up a girl" I mean that I made her pregnant. We will probably continue to use the terms as our traditions dictate, but modern instantaneous electronic media insures that there are fewer and fewer people that live in cultural isolation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

Where I live, "knock up" would always have something to do with getting pregnant, but you might "ring up" someone on the phone.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wangtang

I think you vastly overestimate globalisation in regards to regional usage of language. And especially for non-native speakers of a language, which are arguably in the mayority for English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ManasaIyer

Deeplingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scotologic

"All that for nothing" should be accepted. Reported. This is an idiom. The corresponding idiom in English is "All that for nothing." Other times in DL, if we enter the idiom as a word-for-word translation, it is marked incorrect. Show some consistiency, DL. Yeesh!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/estudiantenoe
estudiantenoe
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I said "All that for nothing" which is what I'm used to saying and hearing in English. The Duo translation seems to mean about the same to me. Can someone explain to me how they differ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brackenwood3

Re - Burke's comment - we would say "After all that, nothing"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bvcruw
bvcruw
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A very clumsy translation for this English speaker. Perhaps it is a common expression in Spanish. 'All that for nothing' is a more useful translation in my 'umble opinion.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lainie44

wouldn't "after all that, nothing" be a better English translation if it is an idiom? I got that marked wrong. I know that there is no "after" in the sentence but if it is an idiom...........????????

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duomylingo69

It's a deep philosophical thought describing the great intricacies of the universe and how it all doesn't matter in the end...

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/murrayjliam

Where is the 'Out' in Spanish?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dnaliw
dnaliw
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About all of that, nothing?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CliffBramlett

For this phrase, your translation would be
Sobre todo eso, nada

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanet_jeanet

It told me it means. From all of that nothing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ezehelm
Ezehelm
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What about 'Of all those, none?'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

That is simply not what is being said. Those is "estos" while "eso" is that. So, in English, think of working for a company for 30 years and then you are told they have not funded your retirement plan. You might say "For all that nothing" or "Of all that nothing." Now think of being a car salesman and you have shown the buyer 30 cars and he says "I don't like any of those." You could respond, "Of all those, none!" "That" even though it refers to 30 years, it is 30 years of hard work and work is singular. When you are talking about 30 cars, cars is plural and is referred to as those.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PitchPine1

How about - you run around all day cooking and cleaning preparing for a party then no one shows up (sob)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/asidin

what about "nothing out of all that "?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eliteporter

This sentence seems awkward in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maraazlin

From all of that, nothing. Was marked wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tortugatwin

Could it also be used like "you're welcome", de nada, only in a larger sense? For all of that, think nothing of it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisWhatever

I tried "from everything, nothing" as I liked the balance of the sentence. But Duo didn't like my feeble attempts. I won't try to be poetic again.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Parmachella

In over 60 years I've never heard an English speaker utter some of the phrases or sentences Duolingo concocts. And none of my cohort has either, and we are a varied group from non-educated to doctoral level people. A good rule of thumb might be, if there are more than 19 responses of confusion, the designers could heed the learners and amend the program. They are after all, continually altering the format and design. I count at least four times in the past year and a half. If they can change the mechanics, why not the content, instead of making requests that we stop posting comments to avoid "clutter." (Duolingo's term for this discussion.) Stimulus and response: remove the stimuli and they won't have the "clutter."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CliffBramlett

A good suggestion might be to use the feedback tools by clicking the flag after the lesson you dislike. If an option you want is not there, it is because someone else has already reported it so it does not need to be reported again. Complaining here only clutters the chat.
Also note that regional differences in language can be massive. For example: Speech differences between Northern and Southern United States.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BuzzWillia

"Of everything, nothing" should be a valid translation too. It means the same thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arifmalik

From all that, nothing. What kinda english is that?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kurtla
kurtla
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Would you use if somebody offered you a table full of different foods, and you dont want any of it? The question to you is what do you want, and you would point at the table and say: from all of that, nothing

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryEllen246097
MaryEllen246097Plus
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What English language is it? It is “poetic license” to show deep feeling and passion.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaxlyn

How can "nada" mean both "anything" and "nothing" at the same time?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CliffBramlett

It does not. In this sentence 'todo' is 'all that'. If you are speaking of the general terms for 'anything', some examples are:

  • 'cualquier cosa' (anything, whatever, whatsoever)
  • 'algo' (something, some, anything)
  • 'todo' (all, everything, all of)

Source: Google translate (which has gotten pretty accurate for general use as of 2017/06).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gigiwells

Isn't there a line from Hamlet in here somewhere?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FarFrm_Perfect

I feel like most of the phrases in this lesson are teaching you how to argue.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tatarBurak

what is this??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WodgerWabbit

I tried "All for nothing!" but it was rejected. Is that not a good translation?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasClarke9
ThomasClarke9
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Makes me think of The bridge on the River Kwai. Madness! Madness!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CARLOSDANG130097

Opps. Had visions of "Creature From the Black Lagoon",... (from all that swims)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankFox0

"De todo eso, nada" is a fine sentiment for many of life's less fortunate moments. I also like the muted sorrow of the phrase "todo por nada".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryEllen246097
MaryEllen246097Plus
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They gave the answer: "Out of that, nothing". But the Hints for De and Todo didn't even mention "out". I have reported it.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SwanWafty

I answered, Nothing from all of that. Marked wrong!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaryRamsden1

Probably better to say 'after all that, nothing!'

5 months ago
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