"L'enfant a été adopté par mon oncle et ma tante."

Translation:The child has been adopted by my uncle and my aunt.

July 7, 2014

50 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John787925

I didn't try this, but would it be acceptable to switch the two people around, since "my aunt and uncle" is the more common word order in English?

March 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew48

In real translation, yes, but the problem is that Duolingo, being a computer, can't discern whether or not you understand or have confused the words for "uncle" and "aunt" in your head. So it's better to stick with the same order as Duolingo gives.

March 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nbreen3

Kind of a tangent but anyone know why english speakers (or at least northeastern americans) generally order aunt then uncle?

January 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaraGalesa

It's probably way too late to answer this, but you always start with the word which has the (stressed) vowel nearer the front of your mouth. That's why we say black and white and the French say blanc et noir.

January 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kkayda

Never too late, Sara! And thank you for that information. I never before considered the formation of vowels as a factor.

January 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clintack

That's fascinating.

September 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gemsmum

It is just easier to say I think. Try saying uncle and aunt and it doesn't roll off the tongue so easily.

January 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew48

I've often wondered that myself. The woman always seems to come first when talking about relatives: mom and dad, grandma and grandpa (though we say brother and sister).

January 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kkayda

I'm not sure , but I think the rule is alphabetic...Aunt & Uncle, Boy and Girl, Man and Woman, Gail and Doug, Jim and Susan...etc.

May 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laura131720

Gail and Doug isn't alphabetical though...

November 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew48

Interesting theory, but no one ever thinks about it when they say it, so I doubt that's the case. I think it's probably just whatever sounds better.

May 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wfluckett

ladies first

August 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ehob

This is what I learned many years ago and still use today. Also, i learned that one never puts oneself first in a list of people, eg. my brother and I, not me and my brother. I still correct children when I hear it, bu to no avail lol (sorta)

March 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin968039

@nbreen3, for you and anyone else who might want to know- Americans usually mention the women first. This was a tradition established a Very long time ago and was done to show respect for the woman. It is the same sentiment that gave rise to a man opening the door for a woman, the phrase,"Ladies first." And the gentleman's belief of, "women and children first..." We still (hopefully), teach our daughters to never be involved with any man who doesn't show her proper respect.

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulieJarvi2

Alphabetical order is comfortable -try it. The same seems to apply to French

May 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulaPelayo24

Why not 'kid' instead of 'child'? It is the same.

October 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wfluckett

Kids are the offspring of goats, it wouldn't accept infant either.

August 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lew95603

I agree. However if that's the case why was the correct response "kid" and not child?

June 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fuzzy255433

kid is less formal than child, closer to gamin

September 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaKapsule44

What is the difference of sense between : was adopted ou has been adopted ?

June 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A-L-Tupper

The difference in these verb tenses is difficult to explain, but they do not mean quite the same thing. In some ways it's similar to the difference between the passé composé and the imparfait in French. You would use "was" adopted if you were discussing the action as an event at a specific time. E.g. "The child was adopted in 1988." You would use "has been adopted" when it is an act that has been completed at some unspecified point in the past (as you can see I am even using this verb tense in this sentence). For example, if you returned to an orphanage you visited some time ago and inquired about a baby you saw on the original visit, an employee could inform you, "The child has been adopted." If you then asked, "When?", the person would have to respond, "The child was adopted two months ago." It does not make sense to say, "The child has been adopted two months ago."

September 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaKapsule44

I love your response ! Now, it's totally clear for me. I will use the same explanation when I will have the opportunities. Many thanks. :)

September 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A-L-Tupper

I'm glad it helped, and I'm sorry you had to wait a year for someone to answer your question!

September 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaKapsule44

Better late than never. :)

September 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/portelli100

Why are there two past participles of 'etre' and of 'adopter', and why do they follow 'avoir'?

September 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArkanGaulson

That's just how passive constructions work in French. Remember in English it works in almost the exact same manner. "a été" is basically "has been".

Active voice: The dog ate the homework. / Le chien a mangé mon devoir.
Passive voice: The homework had been eaten by the dog. / Mon devoir a été mangé par le chien.

(Of course the more common passive voice construction would be "The homework was eaten by the dog." but I used "had been eaten" for emphasis).

October 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/motoco1

Please, for L'enfant a été adopté, explain the difference between the child was adopted and the child has been adopted

July 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

They are both valid (and accepted) translations of the French sentence. The only way to tell which it is is from context, which we don't have here.

August 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/motoco1

Thank you Emile 737. This always bothers me.

August 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

You're not alone in that... You're welcome!

August 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisaskier

Interesting that Duo gave just me "the kid" instead of "the child" as the correct translation......in previous questions and discussions it has been said that in French it is incorrect to use kid/kids for enfant/enfants.

March 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jak202

If referring to a female child, is there a reason why "l'enfant a éte adoptée par mon oncle et ma tante" is not acceptable?

July 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aucunLien

No, it is correct and should be accepted. It is quite the exception though, normally the grammatical gender of a noun and the sex of the designated person are completely irrelevant to each other (although they match more often than not, granted). For example "Cette personne a éte adopté" is ungrammatical even if it's a male. But 'enfant' can be feminine or masculine, following the child's sex, while not changing itself (so there is no 'une enfante'). That is very rare in the French language, but also happens with some jobs "un chef, une chef"

So to sum up, and unless I underestimate your proficiency, you're right, but you're wrong to be right :)

July 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jak202

Bonne réponse. C'est ce que je pensais aussi. Merci!

July 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dunedin17

It rejects "Aunty"

June 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaomiEruwa

Yeah! Surely "aunty" and "auntie" are the same so why mark it incorrect

March 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisaskier

I agree that they are the same, however Duo is asking for the more formal "Aunt" in this sentence. I have been marked wrong for writing "dad" instead of "father" previously ;}

March 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanahawker

Why does "the child HAD been adopted..." not work? One would commonly say that in English, and they both mean the same.

November 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew48

That would be "L'enfant avait été adopté."

"Has been" and "had been" are not synonomous. The latter is in the past perfect indicates that the action occured before another action, which would be expressed in the simple past.

November 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Inguin-freyr

Could someone explain to me how this is the 'passive voice'?

Passive voice is used when the focus is on the action. It is not important or not known, however, who or what is performing the action.

https://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/grammar/passive

But aren't 'my uncle and my aunt' performing the action of adopting the child?

January 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew48

They are, but the difference is that the verb is conjugated to agree with l'enfant rather than mon oncle et ma tante.

Compare:

"L'enfant a été adopté par mon oncle et ma tante."

with

"Mon oncle et ma tante ont adopté l'enfant."

So, in the passive voice, the recipient of the action comes first, and the verb is conjugated according to it, instead of whoever performed the action.

January 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Inguin-freyr

Thank you for clarifying that!

January 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leyciipuccino

What's the difference between de and par? I got this 'est aimé de son peuple' not 'par son peuple'.

August 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kkayda

Here's the little bit I understand, although both mean "by", they have different uses. Par is used to describe 1) a manner of doing something, 2) also means through 3) also means according to. De is used to show 1) possession, 2) a reason or cause, 3) to show the origen of someone/thing (ie: de America = from America), 4) in a French name ie: Jean de Baptiste (fictional) it indicates royalty.

August 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leyciipuccino

Well, thank you! Noted! Anyway, this is how I understand the usage: PAR is used when the subject does something to the object whereas DE is used for anything accept for what PAR is used for. CMIIW.

August 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabnSaa

Would "The child has been adopted by my uncle and aunt" be accepted? In English we wouldn't normally add the modifier to both.

November 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ajcwpage

Did Joy's question get answered, b/c I've often wondered the same thing..."my uncle and my aunt" is so wordy, but "mon oncle et tante" seems wrong, as does "mes oncle et tante".

July 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllanManch

"the child was adopted by my aunt and uncle." Ladies before gentlemen. Uncle and aunt sound just a bit off to my ears. Yeah it is supposed to be "Mr. and Mrs., because there was a Mr. before there was a Mrs, but other than that, the female should come first by etiquette

November 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gianfranco456721

Mysentence was correct

February 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulieJarvi2

I think in English one would actually say aunt and uncle as we tend to go for alphabetical order like 'coming and going' rather than 'aller et venir'

May 1, 2019
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