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"La bourse de Paris"

Translation:The Paris Stock Exchange

1
5 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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I'd love to hear the etymology of how French uses the same word for stock exchange and scrotum!

41
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Originally, "une bourse" was a small (leather) bag containing precious things, primarily money. It was the ancestor of a simple purse.

80
Reply33 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kgoneil13

As in every language I imagine, English has many metaphorical references to private parts . As to the idea of a bag holding precious things, I offer the English slang "family jewels", defined as follows on dictionary.com:

noun, Slang. 1. the male genitals. Examples from the web for family jewels Expand. If you live off the sales of the family jewels, you'll soon be at the mercy of the pawn-broker.

16
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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"les bijoux de famille" also exist in French.

32
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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And I've now realised that 'burse' used to be a term meaning purse in English, mostly surviving in the verb 'reimburse'. 'Burse' could have easily have been caught up in the same euphemism treadmill as 'bourse'.

14
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perseph1955
Perseph1955
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Also, the English "bursar."

13
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Soroush94
Soroush94
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hmm I think what we call bursa in anatomy is quite related to this :D small bags containing fluid to make joints move better!

14
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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That's amazing. Thanks Sitesurf.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GhislaineF10
GhislaineF10
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Odd that it's feminine

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josh5now

Purse, scholarship, stock exchange, among other more dubious meanings...

10
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annaannaannaan

i'm curious to know if "Euronext Paris" is an accepted translation. has anyone dared try it?!

5
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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No it is not, but congrats for your financial culture!

13
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annaannaannaan

merci! :) & i think it ought to be accepted if i dare suggest...

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JazzyFrench

It should be as it was renamed to such in 2000. But, the physical building itself may be referred still as the La Bourse de Paris.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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"La Bourse de Paris" is in fact the name of the institution (re. London Stock Exchange), since the Palais Brongniart (real name of the building), located Place de la Bourse (2nd arrondissement) has been turned to an event venue. This building belongs to the Paris City Hall and it is managed by an event company called GL Events.

The Parisian Stock Exchange firm is located rue Cambon (1st arrondissement), in a modern building.

The name of the group is Euronext, covering French, Belgian, Dutch and Portuguese stock markets. Euronext Paris is therefore the French branch.

14
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NYC-Rocker

Sitesurf, your extensive knowledge in so many subjects is mind boggling! You are my hero. ^_^ (If one believes in reincarnation, I suspect you have been around many many times and have brought much with you.) ;)

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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I have news for you: the Paris Stock Exchange moved again a couple of months ago to the business area near Paris called "la Défense".

Pics here

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Yes, that's what I read as well. Actually La Défense is not a city, but an area located across 3 cities (Courbevoie, Nanterre, Puteaux). The city of Paris (probably jealous) has managed to extend part of its power over a larger territory called "Le Grand Paris", due to become effective within a few years, that will of course cover La Défense.

3
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JazzyFrench

Thanks for the update. My understanding is La Défense is the largest concentration of office space in all of Europe. More even than Canary Wharf in London where I used to work

2
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JazzyFrench

Many thanks Sitesurf. Yes, I have seen the old building in the 2nd but not the new one.

Perhaps, the information sources are different in English but all the references I have seen to the Paris Stock Exchange are using now the Euronext Paris designation.

So, are the French using still the La Bourse De Paris name for the institution and not the Euronext Paris or the French equivalent of that name?

BTW: I meant to say "La Bourse de Paris" in my earlier comment I have made the correction.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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If you listen to/read business news reports in the media, you will probably get something like "La Bourse de Paris termine en hausse à la clôture et le CAC 40 a grimpé de 2,37%". Then, it refers to the stock activity operated by Euronext Paris.

Therefore Euronext Paris is the corporate name of the company, used when its own results, as a listed company, are commented on, for example.

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JazzyFrench

Cool. The Paris Stock Exchange lives on!

2
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deborah853655

this one marked me wrong for the Paris exchange but translated it at the Paris Bourse?

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ackworth

should it be Bourse rather than bourse?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EvelynOlson0

Why should I have to learn this if I don't know what a stock exchange is? (I'm 11)

1
Reply21 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perseph1955
Perseph1955
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This is how you learn what stuff is. Become a lifelong learner. When you get to something you don't yet know, Google it and find out. Amaze your friends with your store of knowledge! Have a lingot for encouragement. Good luck!

5
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EvelynOlson0

Thanks so much!

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perseph1955
Perseph1955
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You're on track now. Terrific!

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maverickpl
maverickpl
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Shouldn't the French be capitalized as well since this is a proper noun?

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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"la bourse" is not considered as a proper noun in French, unless, maybe, you talk about the building itself.

11
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
ThanKwee
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Another example: In English it's the Eiffel Tower. In French it's la tour Eiffel.

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EhsanKarimi
EhsanKarimi
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'Paris Stock Exchange' was marked incorrect

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Missing "the"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EhsanKarimi
EhsanKarimi
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yes

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/priyantoro

I am sure "Paris Stock Exchange" should be accepted. Mine was marked wrong.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barbie21144

Did anyone think the male speaker was saying, "La bourse est a Paris." When he was speaking quickly, that's what it sounded like to me. When I slowed it down, of course, then I could clearly hear "de."

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Parsamana
Parsamana
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I thought scholarship, like the Paris scholarship, but was rejected.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oscarhugo52

Bourse is not written as a proper noun but the 'correct' translations become proper nouns such as 'The Bourse of Paris' or 'The Paris Stock Exchange'. Then while 'market' is given as an alternative translation for 'bourse' it is not accepted. If it is to be specifically translated as the Paris Stock Exchange then it should be written as La Bourse de Paris.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AntonioEmba

CAC 40

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carolsmith17484

there was no sound with this exercise, therefore unable to do it!

0
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kgoneil13

Why is Parisian not an acceptable translation for "de Paris"?

-2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
ThanKwee
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That should have been accepted. Thanks.

-3
Reply3 years ago