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  5. "Very good. I have a little G…

"Very good. I have a little Gaelic."

Translation:Glè mhath. Tha beagan Gàidhlig agam.

January 23, 2020

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerickRethans

Why is it "beagan Gàidhlig" and not "Gàidhlig beag"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivitcyex

Beagan is a little bit while beag is small sized.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

So it is actually a possessive 'a wee bit of Gaelic' but Gàidhlig does not change.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurenGaelic

I learned that "Tha rud beag Gàidhlig agam" is also okay?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob523788

How do I know to use mhath in this sentence instead of math?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Inserting the h is called 'lenition'. It is described in https://duome.eu/tips/en/gd#Phrases

Certain words cause lenition and glè is one of them as described in https://duome.eu/tips/en/gd#Pets


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I2cGAc67

I have read the prior comments, and still do not understand why in this case the adjective comes before the noun, when that is usually not the case in Gaelic. Why is it correct to say "beagan Gaidhlig," but not "Gaidhlig beagan"or Gaidhlig beag"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

You don't know because they haven't told you and they haven't told you because nobody knows. Some languages (like English) put adjectives before the noun. Some (like Spanish) put them after. And some (like Gaelic, Welsh and French) put most after and a few specific common ones before. How this came about is unknown, but it is often the same ones. For example Gaelic seann, Welsh hen and French vieux all mean 'old' and all go before the noun. If you are having trouble sleeping you could try this to cure your insomnia.

However, something else is going on with beagan. It is not an adjective but a noun. The word little is confusing, but you can tell which it is because if it is an adjective you can replace it with small or wee, which would be beag and go after the noun. But that doesn't work here. So this shows that beagan is different - it means 'a little bit' so beagan Gàidhlig means 'a little bit [of] Gaelic'. D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I2cGAc67

Tapadh leat, a DhaibhidhR! That's a very helpful explanation. Not surprised by the fact that idiosyncrasies exist in languages, but good to receive the validation that I didn't miss anything in a prior tip, and that beagan actually means "a little of bit of." Tioraidh!

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