" smiogaid."

Translation:Two chins.

January 27, 2020

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaillaighSue

I thought haggis was made from ofal & ancased in the stomach of the animal? Where do the chins come in?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALittleMarrtin

Does this mean something in Scotland? In America "double chin" is a somewhat pejorative description of an overweight person's face. Does it carry the same meaning in Scotland?

If not, this seems like a weird thing to count...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/junkming1

In Scotland, haggis is traditionally graded by its number of chins. One- or two-chinned haggis is considered run-of-the-mill. Three-chinned haggis is very high quality. Four-chinned haggis (taigeis ceithir-smiogaidanach as it is known to afficionados) is extremely rare and of course commands the highest price. This might help explain the Caledonian obsession with chin counting and its early and highly appropriate appearance in the Duolingo course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lacey-Marie

That is very interesting! Would the same word be used for the chin on your face? That's where I'm getting confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaneyCKidd

I think junkming1 is being a bit spòrsail at the expense of our American friends. I am reminded of a Dundonian pal explaining 'keech' to innocent tourists...what larks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALittleMarrtin

So fascinating! Tapadh leibh :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

But does it make any difference which legs are shorter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Batbutch1

I just love knowing that.

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