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"Él es sacerdote."

Translation:He is a priest.

5 years ago

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/theblueorigami

Not sure why Él es un sacerdote" is incorrect, but "Mi abuelo es un carpintero" is fine. :(

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
MrHazard
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In another forum, a native speaker explained it this way: if it is a profession (lawyer, priest, cook, etc.), then no article is required. If it is a hobby, then an article is required: "Es un abogado y un cocinero." So maybe , re the my grandfather reference, "es cocinero y un carpentero" (a cook by profession and a carpenter in his spare time).

I guess it's pretty tough to be a priest as a hobby!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleGoetz
KyleGoetz
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Why don't you need "un" here for Él es un sacerdote?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NobleJohn
NobleJohn
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The Spanish don't use articles for professions. I was told that it's because a profession, as opposed to a job, is considered to be an inherent part of who a person is. So as in English, articles are not used when describing a characteristic of a person.. e.g. He is tall, He is blonde, He is priest

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valleystarz

Your kind of answer is what makes duolingo that much better. Thanks so much! :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

But where is the line drawn for professions? Farmer? Lawyer? Professor? I'm going to have to watch this closer now to figure it out.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MSEC110

While there's no grammatical difference in English, there's a difference between job and career that transcends what the job title actually is; in other words, would you identify yourself in relation to your job or no? It is a fine line, and as per the earlier comment, carpentry can be a hobby and/or a short-term job, or it can be a profession; I'd love to hear a native speaker's take on how this would affect the determiner.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tangrenjie
Tangrenjie
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Danke.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Schneckenwalzer
Schneckenwalzer
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I was just asthonished to read "danke" because I am German. Since there is no spanish course for native german speakers learn spanish with the help of my favourite language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linguismo

What is the difference between un cura and un sacerdote?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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According to the following thread, un sacerdote is more formal.

http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=858162

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

This is a little tricky. It seems that in Spanish they are both parish priests, however in English a curate is an assistant charged with curing souls and is subordinate to the parish priest.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WeekzGod
WeekzGod
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do people really say sacerdote? I hear people saying stuff like "yo quiero el padre. es un gran hombre."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Do English speakers really say priest rather than father? Priest and sacerdote are the profession. Father and Padre are titles preceeding the names of individual Priests/sacerdotes.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GiovanniSantucci

Yes, English speakers call them priests. We call them Father only as a name, but we never refer to them as "the fathers" or something like that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GiovanniSantucci

In English we refer to "the Fathers" as short for "the Apostolic Fathers," for example. So I should clarify that we don't refer to priests in general as "the fathers" (although we might refer to a particular priest as "Father Robert" or just "Father"), but we do use "the Fathers" for certain specific groups like the "early Church Fathers" or the "Apostolic Fathers" (which you can call just "the Fathers" if they've already been mentioned and it's clear that you're talking about them), similar to how we refer to the founders of the United States as "the founding fathers."

In Spanish, on the other hand, the word "padre" seems to be completely synonymous with the word "priest" as far as I can tell. So although the word "padre" is used twice in a statement such as "Los padres Apostólicos son los padres que conocían los 12 Apóstoles" (sorry about my beginning Spanish and not very good example sentence!), it would be translated into English as "The Apostolic Fathers are the priests who knew the 12 Apostles," using Fathers for the name "padres Apostólicos" but priests for the generic term "padres."

There are many common phrases that I've heard as a native English speaker (and an enthusiastic Catholic) using "priest" and almost never "father," including:

  • "Call a priest!"
  • "Have you thought about becoming a priest?" (If you replaced the word "priest" with "father," the meaning would be "male parent.")
  • "The priest in Confession made me uncomfortable."
  • "Priests can be identified by their special collar."
  • "What do you think about women priests?"

And many more.

Does this help? I'm not quite sure what you wanted explained regarding the wikipedia article, but I tried my best.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GiovanniSantucci

I'll have to check into that! In English, we (Christians, that is) sometimes address God as "Holy Father" (also "Almighty Father," and many more titles) specifically because of the Christian view of God as a father. We believe that God is three persons, which we usually name "the Father" (or "God the Father"), "the Son" (or "God the Son"), and "the Holy Spirit" which is also called the Holy Ghost (spirit comes from Latin, and ghost comes from the German roots of English). The words "Father" and "Son" are intended to describe the relationship between the persons, but Jesus told us to call God "Father," so these things (including Father = God) should be common among any language with a number of Christian speakers. However, to make things a little confusing, we often refer to the Pope as the Holy Father. So I'll be interested in seeing whether Santo Padre refers to God, or the Pope! (The word "Pope" in most languages is also closely related to the word for "Father.")

And yes, my base language is English. I took Italian in college, which has made learning Spanish on Duo Lingo a whole lot easier.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

I was not sure what your base language was. So I was just trying to understand your base of expertise. I also consulted some Vatican sources in Spanish and quickly came to realize God can be translated as Padre as in Santo Padre for "Holy Father." And the phrase "Que Padre!" in Mexico is used like "How cool" is used in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WeekzGod
WeekzGod
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Yes. I know priest is the profession but spanish speakers specifically I've heard say padre. I have a friend whose mother is always saying her son is going to be a priest (in spanish) and she uses the word padre when she says that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

In the US Army troops (Latino and non Latino) often refer to any Chaplain as "Padre" even if he is Jewish. It is just kind of an informal reference.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Does this word have a Latin base/root to it?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoyceA
JoyceA
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Yes. You can check it out on the Real Academia Española website or through this link at WordReference.com.

http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/frames.asp?es=sacerdote

But it comes from the Latin, "sacerdos, -ōtis" (priest) which comes from "sacer, sagrado" (sacred).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Gracias, Joyce. I thought I remembered this from Latin back in high school.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amormi

Thanks, Joyce. My first guest was garbage man from sacar- to take- like to take out the trash. But this explains it :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/celesteparsons

Is minister not right?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NobleJohn
NobleJohn
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Minister is perhaps too ambiguous a translation. It can refer to a non-religious role e.g. Political minister

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
Huysan
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I'm really confused here. Why " He is priest " is incorrect?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NobleJohn
NobleJohn
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In English the occupation must be proceeded by an article - THE or A. In Spanish the opposite is true. Although "He is priest" is an exact translation, it is not correct English. "He is a priest" is the correct answer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Good answer. It can help out those who do not have English as their first language and who are having trouble with English articles. There could be a number of them here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Schneckenwalzer
Schneckenwalzer
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English isn't my first language. Since there is no spanish for germans I have to learn spanish this way. Thus I am doing something for both languages. I learned english long time ago at school and realize that there a lot of things I am not sure about if I am expressing it correctly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Impressive. It's good to see people doing like you are.

There are three kinds English. One, that of the Brits which has a number variations. Then there is the American form of English as shown in English textbooks. Then there is the way Americans actually talk, which like the British has numerous forms, depending on regions.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hernanday

Yeah but how do we know they don't intend to say he is priest, since usually there was an article before the noun.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NobleJohn
NobleJohn
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Because 'he is priest' would be gibberish :) Unless priest was their name, in which case it would be capitalised as a proper noun.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edivide
edivide
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check the voice. the voice say: "el es sEcerdote", and must be say: "él es sAcerdote".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jayee_rockk

If the answer is He is a priest. Shouldntnit read El es una sacerdote?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicoleCai1

;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicoleCai1

IT dint even show the letter"UN'' on there

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kannd86

Why does the 'c' in sacerdote make an 's' sound? I thought the 'c' in Spanish always makes the 'k' sound.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arditampuu

as guessed below, it does indeed depend on the vowel that follows. "ca","co" and "cu" are pronounces with a "k" and "ci" and "ce" with "s" (in Spanish Spanish (as opposed to south american) it's not pronounced a normal "s", but like the "z" letter. So "ce"=="ze" and "ci"=="zi")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

If a "c" falls before an "e" or "i" it has an "s" sound, itherwise, not.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AkAlan

way too many priests here for my liking

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noracully

I wanted to write "He is a priest", but thought that duolingo would mark it incorrect because I added "a" when they didn't add "un". Very confusing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahmadjune

Es un aserdote

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Calimon

Am I the only one who is having to speak so slowly to get the voice microphone to translate what I am speaking? Sometimes it just doesn't pick up most of what I am saying, and I am speaking slowly (which I have the best luck with) loudly and clearly. But it all seems like such a struggle!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonGodiska

You are not the only one. Sometimes it seems to hear me just fine, other times it doesn't understand me at all, and sometimes it calls me incorrect before I even start speaking!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keyfiyet

where is ''a''?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ParkHan

Priest, minister, monk and etc. So many clerics. But only priest.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chocolocochon

He is priest

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasmine713241

cant it be a pope?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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A Pope is un Papa.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonnieGreen1

will not progress past this phrase. it will not accept my execution

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mglenn13

I realize that most Spanish-speaking Christians are Catholic, but I was wondering if the word sacerdote can refer to the equivalent position in Protestant churches as well, or if these churches use other words in Spanish the way they do in English (minister, pastor, etc.)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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They use the other words, ministro, pastor.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mglenn13

Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nintendolife92

its missing the a before priest . it should be un sacerdote

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RealDonald

Forget this nonsense, I'm just going to put UN in front of nouns like it is supposed to be.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cutequesadilla

untill i read this recent explanation on "el" if it does not have the accent on top it means the instead of he

1 year ago