1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Scottish Gaelic
  4. >
  5. "Drathais ghorm."

"Drathais ghorm."

Translation:Blue underpants.

January 28, 2020

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/winchelsea

I noticed that 'drathais' appears to be a cognate with (now slightly archaic) British English 'drawers' for underpants or knickers, but the system does not seem to recognise it. Hence the English joke "Winter draw(er)s on!".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coiseam

Should green (the kind of lurid green on the Duo buttons for instance) not be accepted for 'gorm'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Definitely not. Whilst a dull or dark green can be gorm, a bright lurid green is definitely uaine. Even in Irish, where green is the default translation for glas, you would use uaine for a bright green as an alternative to glas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heidi423390

Is the g pronounced in ghorm?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mickhartsyou

To me it sounds more like it's pronounced as a Y


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RDM18

This one ia really hard to make out!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uU8l10

come on duo lingo, get with it "knickers" are underpants, and so are "pants" (unless you're American), and so are "drawers".....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

There is an issue with how many words they can be expected to add to the list. For synonyms of underpants Wiktionary gives

boxer shorts, briefs, bloomers, (UK) pants, panties, (slang) butt-huggers, undies, (slang) tighty whities, knickers, drawers, (UK, Australia) smalls, (slang, UK) shreddies, (slang, New Zealand) gruds, longjohns, thong, underwear

But against this they have to put in the words that would cover what most people who have understood the word would say in English. It is quite clear from looking in a variety of dictionaries that there are four words much more common than all the others, so clearly these should be included. They are

  • pants (UK)
  • underpants (US)
  • knickers
  • drawers (old-fashioned/regional)

So: yes, definitely.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uU8l10

Thank you for getting back to me. I added a reply on another similar post to say that in Scots (I live in Central Belt of Scotland) we say "drawers" - the main reason I added this was because many people who live in Scotland are learning Scots Gaelic. I'm aware you couldn't possible add them all.

Learn Scottish Gaelic in just 5 minutes a day. For free.