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  5. "Bidh iad ag iasgach a h-uileā€¦

"Bidh iad ag iasgach a h-uile latha."

Translation:They fish every day.

January 30, 2020

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morag_Kerr

I can't help myself. I just type "they are fishing every day" because that's what I would say, and I get a black mark.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnCliffo17

That would be "Tha iad ag iasgachd a h-uile latha."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morag_Kerr

Oh. I don't entirely get it, because that sentence above is supposed to denote that they go fishing every day and what I say if I want to denote that in English is either "they go fishing every day" (most likely) or "they are fishing every day" (less likely). It would never cross my mind to say "they fish every day". It just isn't a set of words I'd use one after the other in that order at all. It seems weird to shoe-horn an unnatural phrase into English for the sake of hair-splitting tenses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/junkming1

I would say 'They go fishing every day.' The repetitive nature is then encapsulated in the 'go'. ie You wouldn't say 'They are going fishing every day.' As far as Duolingo is concerned, I understand why they make these sometimes unnatural, quasi-literal differentiations - it's to train the mind to a slightly different conception of how verbs work, kind of making us think in Gaelic in English, if you see what I mean.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morag_Kerr

It also seems at odds with the consistent favouring of the present participle form when dealing with present-tense answers. The favoured answer for "tha mi ag iarraidh" is always "I am wanting" with "I want" - which is probably more natural in that context - in the status of "another right answer". But in this context if we use the same construction, it's marked flat wrong. It's hard to understand, and I want to understand rather than simply parrot what I have learned will be acceptable to the software.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/junkming1

I actually think it's better not to worry about correct English. We are here to learn Gaelic, not English. This requires a linguistic mindset which is largely alien to an English speaker. It is impossible, for example, to fully express the deeper meaning of ''S e saor a th' annam' in English. 'I am a joiner' gives a superficial equivalence only. Being too wedded to finding precise English equivalence might slow down progress in absorbing the true spirit of the language. For that reason I'm happy to pick up the expected Duolingo responses and give them without too much quibble, concentrating more on absorbing the Gaelic syntax. But each to his own!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/junkming1

Yes, but the point is that 'Tha mi ag iarraidh' is not the same as 'Bidh mi ag iarraidh'. The course constructors have chosen the two primary interpretations as 'I am wanting' for the former, and 'I want' for the second, in order to underline the fact that they are not totally equivalent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morag_Kerr

I'll try to get my head round it. I was just typing the phrase that seemed the natural English way to express the same concept, and confused that it wasn't even "another right answer".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morag_Kerr

I guess I'm still new at this. My feeling was that I knew exactly what the sentence in Gaelic meant, and expressed that in the way I would express the same thing in English. To be constrained into an unnatural English phrase as the only right answer, rather than accepting an accurate expression of the meaning of the sentence as "another correct answer" was a bit irritating. But in the grand scheme of things it's a quibble.

I need to get on with capturing that third castle!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morag_Kerr

I agree about the "go fishing" part. I wonder if they'd insist that there would have to be an "a'dol" in there to allow that. I think I'm just baulking at the required answer being in a contrived construction that's wholly unnatural in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnCliffo17

Honestly I don't see anything unnatural about "they fish every day". "Fish" is a valid way to say the present continuous form of "fishing" e.g. "Teach a man to fish".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morag_Kerr

Seems weird to me. But there are multiple ways of saying the same thing for most sentences longer than a few words. I'm not sure why this one isn't accepted as a correct alternative here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DebF26
  • 1193

I tried "They go fishing every day", and it was rejected


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ionnsaiche

Correct, because this sentence doesn't talk about them going anywhere - it talks about them fishing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marvin_Mac_Frank

Why would you use the future form "bidh" in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrevorStri5

Why won't it accept "they are fishing every day" which is how it would be said round here.

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