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  5. "Chan eil an nighean agam brò…

"Chan eil an nighean agam brònach."

Translation:My daughter is not sad.

January 30, 2020

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morag_Kerr

Does anyone know why it's "mo mhac" but "an nighean agam"?

Sons are inalienable but daughters are ailienable? Really?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Uilebheist19

OTOH, it's "mo bhean", but "an duine agam", for some reason.

I believe "mo nighean" means "my girlfriend". Like in the song "Mo nighean donn bhòidheach".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ionnsaiche

If you do the learner's course from SMO, they'll use mo nighean


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesOHare8

so, I do not have a sad daughter is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graham737607

But there must be a reason why it’s “mo mhac” but not “ mo nighean” - it can’t surely be down to alienable or inalienable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morag_Kerr

Sometimes things just are what they are, but it would be nice to have even a theory as to why to help remember, if nothing else!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blackschnauzer

I've been wondering if there was some kind of logic tom help tell if something is alienable or inalienable...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TroyLatta

Seems backwards to me. After all, "A son is a son till he gets a wife, but a daughter's a daughter for life."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Idoia114298

I read in another comment a while ago that Gaelic referred to women either as nighean- maiden (unmarried woman) - or bean ( married women). That could explain why nighean can be used with agam (as daughter) or mo ( as my girlfriend).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Idoia114298

And caileag is also unmarried woman.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SandraSmit509106

In the notes for the section entitled: Body 2, they explain that inalienable possession (using mo, do, etc), is used for "close family members, but not husbands". So I would assume that 'daughter' is simply another exception. Perhaps related to the fact that girls often take on the husband's surname?

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