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  5. "An robh an t-orainsear saor?"

"An robh an t-orainsear saor?"

Translation:Was the orange cheap?

January 31, 2020

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottWisem5
  1. Not sure I'm getting the "travel" aspect of cheap oranges.
  2. I've always associated "saor" with free, as in Saor Alba! Which I'm hoping doesn't mean "Scotland is going cheap, get it while you can"

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

The verb saor means to free. So yes Saor Alba does mean Free Scotland. The noun saor is a joiner or a carpenter. And the adjective can either mean free (as in no longer captive) or cheap, but not free as in without cost. At least not on its own Saor an-asgaidh is free (of charge) and thus no cost. https://learngaelic.scot/dictionary/index.jsp?abairt=saor&slang=both&wholeword=false


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tj4234

Saor Alba doesn't mean anything. It's a made up phrase which has become widely popular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Every phrase is made up at some point. That does not invalidate it. But people who hear it in English, as Free Scotland just assume it is an adjective, which does not make any sense as the slogan of independence.

If saor is an adjective meaning 'free' then it would be Alba Shaor as adjectives go after nouns and Alba is feminine, like all countries. But with the saor first it is the verb meaning 'free', not the adjective. So this is an imperative to free Scotland, in the same way that the Dubliners make the demand to 'Free the People' (YouTube link)

So it makes sense as a demand that Scotland be freed, not a statement that Scotland is free.

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