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  5. Tha mi deiseil... de a nis?

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveMowbr

Tha mi deiseil... de a nis?

First ever post...

So that's me completed the Gaelic course -- I have to say Duolingo appears to be a brilliant (sgoinneil) learning resource an I have definitely progressed further in less time since starting this journey... The only trouble is now that I have some solid foundations in the language I am eager to continue the learning process -- is there another follow up Scottish Gaelic course planned for release soon?

Tapadh leibh

February 7, 2020

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrishF3

This is probably my 5th go at learning Gaelic! The material hasn’t really existed in the past. Thanks to Duolingo I am being more successful this time. I’m watching BBCAlba as a support - even when starting out I could look out for words I knew- and since it’s subtitled in Scots Standard English I can enjoy all the content. It’s well good hearing folk using the language in a modern context! You’ve done well completing the course so quickly. I’ve also bought Astérix in Gaelic (and I love the translations into Scots as well!) and a short novel for adult learners “Ròna agus MacCodruim” - it’s about a selkie as you might guess- written by a native of Maine, USA, who trained as a Gaelic teacher at a Jesuit university in Nova Scotia, then taught on Islay, published by a Dutch firm; how’s that for international? I’ve also got a book of Gaelic insults “The naughty little book of Gaelic” - by a Nova Scotian author as I’m a firm believer in knowing what rude things folk might be saying, imagining everyone is monolingual. “I wish you were on St Kilda.” B’fhearr leam gun robh ann an h’-Irt! Bàs gun sagart ort are appealing. I’m finding the listening items challenging when the older woman speaks. Wish the Gaelic course had the facility to slow down speech like the German course has. (Not to mention the grammatical introductions available in that course, because I like to know how a language is structured- like doing the frame of a jigsaw first.) The Duolingo course however is glè mhath. Tha mi toilichte .. Slàinte mhath PS wish spell check didn’t try to substitute words from another language


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnitaRRC

Thank you for the wealth of information


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveMowbr

thank you heaps TrishF3 will be following up your helpful suggestions for sure - also from moderator responses I have seen in other threads it does sound like a second Scottish Gaelic course is in the pipeline


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rona460381

There is a lot of material at a variety of levels available on the LearnGaelic website - including a couple of courses previously hosted by the BBC.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohanaSchw

Mine is an awkward question: Scottish and Irish from the NW have similarities.. How did the cultural linguistic elements cross the Celtic Isles -such as the alternative to a verb for "have"? Are there differences across the Celtic languages? Ireland has the distinct culture and is prominent. Does Irish define the Gaelic branch of the Celtic tree? This derived from my curiosity about the meaning of Father across the Celtic regions. Gabh mo leisgeul; tha mi duilich.

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