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  5. Maori, K'iche and Yucatec in …

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewFran210839

Maori, K'iche and Yucatec in the incubator!!!

I hope these languages stay in the incubator and aren't errors like the Norwegian/Lithuanian, Hindi/Bulgarian and Hindi/Gujarati courses are. Does anyone else have any more information about these? I would love to learn these languages!

February 11, 2020

66 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ueck1

It was established at Duocon that a Maori course was in the works behind the scenes. The Mayan flag appeared years ago in the old Duolingo flag sprite, but no one knew which kind of Mayan it would be used for or when the course would start development.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DragonPolyglot

I wonder if Yucatec Maya and K'iche Maya would have different flags? And what flags they might be?

I also really hope this will help the demand for a Nahuatl course for Spanish speakers, as well as other indigenous languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/belstar128

Duolingo is becoming the place to learn american and pacific languages i wish they added more stuff from Africa and Asia at least K'iche has more than 1 million speakers so it may be worth it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewFran210839

I hope they add more African languages... for now, all Duolingo has is Swahili. I think they have a good amount of Asian languages (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Indonesian and Hindi) but they should add more Indian languages, Persian, Tagalog, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/torikku

I'd love to see some more languages spoken in Africa, added- particularly Afrikaans.

(Edit: accidentally referred to Afrikaans as an African language ^^'')


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonpaulYoh

Tamazight or some other major Berber language would be an awesome African addition to Duolingo! 8-10 million Berberic speakers from Morocco to Lybia is a good indication that it isn't just a dead language!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zia177448

If they stay there, that's exciting!!!

I know they said they wanted to add Maori, so that might be a good sign for the other two as well. :)

EtA: I'm surprised that they added both Yucatan and K'iche', so I wouldn't be surprised if they deleted one of them. And I kind of would have expected them to add those languages from Spanish, not from English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HappyEvilSlosh

The Yucatan and K'iche' courses are from Spanish...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ignatznkrazy

Yucatec and K'iche for English rather than Spanish speakers. I'm not convinced although I've been wrong before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ueck1

They just changed the two to Yucatec and K’iche for Spanish speakers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivitcyex

It would actually be interesting to do these languages from English because we get a sizable number of indigenous immigrants here that speak minimal or no Spanish (CA, USA). I still think it's less likely though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ikuusi

This is great news!

I really hope these course end up being properly developed, instead of being rushed out of the Incubator with only seven or so skills like Hawaiian was.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

There is actually good reason for starting small and expanding later. For a start, it means there will be something out there sooner - when teams take the time to make a longer initial course, then there are always complaints about it being too slow. Also it means that if the team stalls, there's something available already, instead of just a partially finished course sitting in the Incubator going nowhere.

It also means the team can spend more time polishing the beginning of the tree, which is the most important part. If they focus on the first few skills they can get them right faster, and then they'll be free to spend more time focusing on the next section than they would have otherwise.

Also, changing the structure of a big tree is a monumental task. If they start small, then it's a lot easier to adjust according to what they've learned in the next version if they've got a small tree. If they start with just a few skills, then when they build the next version they can fix problems with the first much more easily as well as being able to focus on adding another section of new skills.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RemingtonL5

If the courses are real, I hope they turn out more like the Guarani and Hawaiian courses than the Navajo course. The Navajo course wasn't necessarily bad, but it didn't meet Duolingo's typical level of quality. It seems like they were in a rush to get the course into beta by Oct 12, 2018. I was okay with them rushing a small course to beta, since Hawaiian got updated with new skills and grammar tips regularly after being released, but Navajo still has the same 11 skills as when it started (no tips, little voice-overs). I guess I shouldn't complain, though - we are getting these courses for free.


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