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"Bob Marley is the one who composed the song Three Little Birds."

Translation:ʻO Bob Marley ka mea i haku i ke mele ʻo Three Little Birds.

February 12, 2020

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MSwRTR

The ʻo before the song title... Can someone please explain why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

Just copying my answer here from farther down:

The ʻo is used to mark the subject, but also used before names in general, unless the name is a direct object in the sentence.

If the sentence was "Bob Marley is the one who composed Three Little Birds" the translation would read "ʻO Bob Marley ka mea i haku iā Three Little Birds". But in this case, because the prompt reads "the one who composed the song Three Little Birds" the translation is "ka mea i haku i ke mele ʻo Three Little Birds".

You could also think of the ʻo as going where a comma might go before a name. For example, "the song, Three Little Birds" -> "ke mele ʻo Three Little Birds". Does that help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethKing-M

Why is it wrong to translate the song title as well as the rest of the sentence? Does that make it a different song? Neither was in quotes, so stringent accuracy shouldn't be the problem, and translation of the song title for clarity in the target language, I would think, would make more sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Komota15

In my experience at least, song names and art often retain their native titles across languages. Growing up on the mainland we learned plenty of spanish named songs in grade school, and "Aloha 'Oe" is named as such far more than its english title "Farewell to Thee"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

Aloha e Beth, I tend to agree with Komota, but ʻEkolu Manu Liʻiliʻi should be accepted as a translation for Three Little Birds now. I don't think it's necessary to mark folks wrong if they translate the title. Mahalo for sharing your manaʻo and asking great questions here on the forums!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacKinzieRob

I agree with the commenters here. To translate "Kaulana na pua" into "Famous are the flowers' doesn't seem to make sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harald948051

Why is the ʻo. Three Little Birds are not subject of the sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

Good question, and I see someone else asked about the same thing further up this thread. The ʻo is used to mark the subject, but also used before names in general, unless the name is a direct object in the sentence.

If the sentence was "Bob Marley is the one who composed Three Little Birds" the translation would read "ʻO Bob Marley ka mea i haku iā Three Little Birds". But in this case, because the prompt reads "the one who composed the song Three Little Birds" the translation is "ka mea i haku i ke mele ʻo Three Little Birds".

You could also think of the ʻo as going where a comma might go before a name. For example, "the song, Three Little Birds" -> "ke mele ʻo Three Little Birds". Does that help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenBes9

I wrote the correct answer. It was rejected. Let me move on!

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