"Je crois avoir lu ça."

Translation:I think I have read that.

April 30, 2013

114 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smearedink

I am also curious what the deal is here. Is this correct French that just doesn't translate directly into English very well? It reads like "I believe to have read that."

May 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1747

It is something the French call "Past Infinitive". It doesn't translate well to English when trying to do it literally or word-for-word. As such, it creates significant issues when trying to back-translate from English to French. http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/pastinfinitive.htm

July 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/petemehegan

The French go directly to the infinitive with croire and penser...I think I'm going to do that "Je pense faire ça..."

May 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jorge.a.me1

I think it's due to the fact that French is a Romance language. Spanish has an identical construction: "Yo creo haber leido esto," in which the speaker is not sure whether he has read it. "I believe to have read that" is a sentence fragment. A complete sentence would be, for example, "I believe to have read that is to have known Mathematics." Similarly, "I believe having read that" is a fragment. It could be fixed by either something like "I believe in having read that" or "I believe, having read that, that the truth is obvious." Notice though, that all of these "fixes" distort the original meaning. It seems to me English doesn't like having 3 verbs together. The same thing happens with "Je dois faire boullir l'eau" being translated (quite literally) as "I have to make the water boil." It seems English just doesn't like having 3 different verbs together in this way.

February 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

Interesting observation. However, English can concatenate three or more verbs in some cases (including where other languages wouldn't, as a result of certain functions being fulfilled by modals):

A: I have to go get my car now, though I would like to have done it earlier.
B: Meanwhile I would like to go start peeling the potatoes.

Granted, it's a little different, because of the phenomenon of the to-infinitive, but if we accept the to-infinitive as a pure verb form, my second example sentence above has five verbs in a row, uninterrupted.

Another example: "I would like to have gone to see her before she died."

February 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/petemehegan

I’m going to have to begin to want to study to be able to make this a part of my lesson plan.

February 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

Or even to be able to stand to consider making it a part of your lesson plan. :-D

February 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/helena72huhtela

"I believe I have read that" and "I believe to have read that" mean exactly the same thing. The latter is only more formal.

August 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph516503

"I believe to have read that" makes no sense to me as a native English speaker. When I (foolishly) entered this, as a direct translation of the French, it was marked wrong, and rightly so I believe.

January 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John787925

You could say "I believe [someone] to have read that", but it sounds weirdly archaic compared to "I believe [s/o] has read that." But yeah, without an object it just sounds entirely wrong.

March 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/percyflage

Yes, it is a bit formal. But, think of denying something in the passive voice: "I was though to have read that, but had not". Sounds like a politician's way of wriggling out of trouble :)

September 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeValley1

I agree. Have never heard it said and if someone said it I would think it awkward, not formal.

"I believe I read it" is closer to the meaning in English (complicated by the fact that I read and I read are two different tenses, with two different pronunciations, but same spelling in English.

I meant the past tense of course.

August 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

helena72huhtela

That is not correct.

I think/believe I have read that makes explicit who has done the reading. I believe/think to have read that makes no reference to who has done the reading. There is nothing in English or the little context provided to require that I be substituted for to rather than .....you.....

The two phrases do not mean exactly the same thing in English (but apparently do in French). The only way the sentence even makes sense in English is for the listener/reader to replace to with another word which has to be imagined. Depending on how much you want to change the grammar of the English sentence for it to make sense, the list of possible substitutes is quite large.

If Duo is correct that French speakers see this phrase in the way that is suggested, it because that is how French speakers deal with the phrase. It is definitely not because translating it word for word into English provides an answer that means the same thing.

January 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shrinkdad

Or to put it another way, 'translation' is not the same thing as 'transliteration'. If it were, there would be only one grammar for all the world's languages.

By the way, earlier I posted a reply about transitive verbs not taking and infinitive and intransitive verbs taking one. Turns out that's wrong. For a list of english verbs that can take an infinitive Google 'English verbs that take an infinitive' and see examples. Sorry.

January 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

If only prepositions were universal half the world's translation problems would be solved right away.

January 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bredouille

It just seems to be a short way of using croire que with the passé composé. Instead of having to write "Je crois que j'ai lu ça" we can just use the infinitive construction "Je crois avoir lu ça" since the subjects ("je") in the main and dependent clause agree with each other.

June 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DmytroShkr

I think it is not any shortcut taken in popular parlance, rather a logical extension of the otherwise widely used constructions with the infinitive form of the verb. The trick is that the English would readily put up with the passive infinitve (to be done, to have been eaten) in such a construction. Otherwise, it seems to me pretty straightforward:

  • He is rumoured to have invented the bicycle
  • This exhibit appears to have been tampered with

Now...

  • Je crois avoir lu ce livre/ça

Pron + Verb (intr.) + Passive Inf. (bare)

Well, this is what occurred to me, the homemade analyst ;)

July 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John787925

There's a difference between "I am believed to have read that [by others]" (passive) and "I believe to have read that" (active; ungrammatical, in my opinion).

March 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shrinkdad

My hunch is that it's particularly common in spoken french, and especially as a way of avoiding the subjunctive -- especially with irregular verbs. Maybe a native french speaker could weigh in. 1) Il faut aller 2) Il faut que on aille

October 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smearedink

This sounds very reasonable to me, thanks!

July 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DmytroShkr

De rien

July 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shrinkdad

I agree, Bredouille, but it's even more complicated than that. For verbs that don't require the following subordinate clause to be in the subjunctive, either a subordinate clause or the infinitive form is equally good. But in cases where the subjunctive would be required in the subordinate clause, there are several important subcases where the infinitive form MUST be used, and the subordinate clause form is simply grammatically wrong. I think the important thing here, is to get a feel for this common and very french construction and make it part of a growing 'feel' for how french is spoken. All this talk about whether this or that is possible or should really be an acceptable alternative really undermines what we're here for. At least, that's my view.

May 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicholas_ashley

When the subject is the same person in the main clause and in the subordinate clause, you can simplify the latter and use the infinitive instead.

examples

je pensais que je rêvais can be simplified to je pensais rêver
je crois avoir raison - I think I am right
je pense avoir fait mon devoir - I feel I have done my duty
il croit tout savoir - he thinks he knows everything
j'ai cru entendre frapper à la porte - I thought I heard a knock at the door
Je ne pense pas pouvoir partir demain. - I don't think I can go tomorrow
j’espère pouvoir y retourner encore. - I hope I can go back there again
J'espère me sentir mieux demain - I hope I feel better tomorrow
Je suis content d'être là. - I'm happy that I'm here.
Es-tu sûre de devoir travailler samedi ? - Are you sure you have to work Saturday

There are a few exceptions. For example, some conjunctions require a repeated subject in the same sentence, with the aid of the subjunctive.

example

J'ai réussi à l'examen bien que je n'aie pas étudié. - I passed the test even though I didn't study.

March 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shrinkdad

And, at least from the grammar sources I've read, the following verbs never allow the infinitive to be substituted: apprendre, se rendre compte, s'appercevoir, avertir, prévenir, trouver, constater, expliquer, se doubter, informer. These verbs take the indicative mode in the subordinate clause.

March 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.parlange

Thanks, Nicholas, for your really helpful comment and exemples. A red jewell for you!

February 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jesada.t

Is it really wrong to say "I believe I have read this"? I thought "ça" could be used for either of them.

December 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

You're right.

April 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xanderificus

Except that DL is marking "believe" as wrong and says that "Je crois" should be translated as "I think".

April 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"Believe" is not wrong if the rest of the sentence is correct, as in "I believe (that) I (have) read that".

April 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YoelPerlman

I have never seen this construction before (Infinitive) + (past participle) does this have a name?

August 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicholas_ashley

When using verbs such as penser, croire, espérer, etc. the following structure

pronoun + conjugated verb + que + pronoun + conjugated verb

can be simplified to

pronoun + conjugated verb + infinitive

on the condition that the two pronouns are the same

examples

je pense avoir lu ça - I think I have read that

je crois avoir raison - I think I am right

il croit tout savoir - he believes he knows everything

j’espère pouvoir y retourner encore. - I hope I can go back there again

j'ai cru entendre frapper à la porte - I thought I heard a knock at the door

Je pensais rêver. - I thought I was dreaming.

Je ne pense pas pouvoir partir demain. - I don't think I can go tomorrow

September 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mapwoman

Thank you, this completely clears up the problem!

October 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1747

It is called "past infinitive" and is explained here: http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/pastinfinitive.htm

July 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

The audio with the female voice sounds really off to me. Is this a case of needing to train my ears, or is it actually bad?

August 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

The sentence sounds a bit fragmented and she forgot the Z liaison between "crois" and "avoir".

August 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

Thank you Sitesurf!

August 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarrelDent

I had a hard time with the audio on this one. I wasn't wearing headphones, but even at the "turtle" speed, I couldn't tell if the past participle was "eu," "vu" or "lu." I incorrectly guessed "eu."

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/semeur

I had the exact same problem. I could not hear the "l" even though I played it over and over. And "ça" sounded like "son." I should have worn headphones.

February 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hovind

It is not "Je crois j'ai lu ça."?

April 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/klooth

I think if you go that way, you have to have "que": "Je crois que j'ai lu ça."

September 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Parsamana

How would you say, "I believe, having seen that!" To clarify, this indicates that as a result of having seen something (let's say an angel), the person has become a believer. The present sentence, on the other hand, is regard the person's belief about having read a certain document.

October 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/billjac

there does seem to be something wrong/missing here... what is the reason for omission of the 'I'?

May 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jytou

Think about it as something like "I think to have read this". Although it is not correct English, this is the construction we use in French.

February 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sabi1220

Maybe a correct addition would be "d'avoir"

May 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/betablocker24

What is wrong with the sentence: "I believe to have read that".

November 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1747

It is not grammatically correct in English. The "I believe" must be followed by a complete statement: subject + verb + (optional) object. That is why in English, we must add I believe I have read that. Or as Bredouille suggested (above), use a different structure with "que" resulting in "I believe that I have read it."

March 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xanderificus

"I believe that I have read it." -- which is exactly what I just entered and DL is telling me that it should be "I think..."

April 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1747

"Believe" is also accepted and has been for two years. "Think" is also correct here. I have been hearing that sometimes correct alternatives are not being accepted. A bug, perhaps. Programmers are always tinkering under the hood.

April 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xanderificus

It rejected "believe" earlier today. Seemed quite strange.

April 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ManfredSteiner

So "Je croire avoir" means "I think I have?"

Is that a general rule?

July 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1747

In this context, yes. It is called the "past infinitive" and is explained here: http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/pastinfinitive.htm

July 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Globelle

I translated this as "I believe having read that". Would an English speaker say it like this?

September 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shrinkdad

In english, your translation is not a sentence because 'having' is not a proper verb form for a sentence. It would be called a 'present participle' which cannot function as a proper verb in a complete sentence. 'I believe having read that' would be a part of something like, 'I believe, having read that, that we should be careful'. The 'having read that' is a subordinate clause that cannot stand alone as a sentence. A more traditional way of expressing the idea would be something like, 'I believe, since I have read that, that we should be careful'. Here, the clause 'since I have read that' is called a subordinate clause beginning with the subordinate conjunction, 'since'. Hope this helps.

September 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

Well, you could say "I believe, having read that" on its own, meaning "having read that, I am now a believer", but that would be a completely different sentence with a very particular implied context.

August 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Globelle

Thank you for the useful explanation.

September 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sbarbour

"I believe to have read that" is not correct grammar in English. as noted, exact translations are not always doable.

April 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1747

That is quite true. This structure is called "past infinitive" and there are some uses that just do not translate to anything resembling natural English. In such cases, English speakers usually opt to change to a different tense or completely rephrase the sentence into something more natural. For this reason, some expressions using the "past infinitive" will not resemble anything that can be back-translated from English to French to end up with the same structure. It is useful to know that the French do use this, however.

July 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daviddempsay

Would it be correct to say, "Je crois que je l'ai lu cela?" Would the subjunctive form be necessary in the second clause?

May 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

"Je crois que je l'ai lu, cela" would be correct. Lawless says that "croire" takes the indicative in an affirmative sentence, and the subjunctive in a negative or interrogative sentence:

May 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daviddempsay

Thanks. I was pretty sure that the subjunctive would not be necessary here, but it has been some time since I studied such things. Now I'm wondering if the subjunctive would be needed in the second clause if the sentence were, "I believe that I MIGHT have read that."

May 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

Lawless says "peut-être que" doesn't take the subjunctive, so I would think you could make a sentence with "croire" and "peut-être" to get the sense of "might" without requiring the subjunctive.

As for the first sentence you asked about, it occurs to me now that I didn't really take note of the pronoun reduplication, as I was focusing on the part of the question about the subjunctive. I'd probably go with "j'ai lu cela" for the second clause instead, though I don't think the way you wrote it, with "je l'ai lu, cela", is wrong (but I think it would take a comma between "lu" and "cela"). My sense is that the construction would be more colloquial – something like "I believe I've read it, that".

May 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minion_mark

Why not 'Je crois que j'ai lu ça'?

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

That's another correct way of putting it, in French.

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shrinkdad

Just as long as you remember that if the verb were such that it required the subjunctive in the subordinate clause, the fact that the subject of the main and subordinate clause are the same means that you would have to use the infinitive form. Using 'que' and a subordinate clause would be grammatically incorrect. At least, that's how I understand french grammatical rules.

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

Oh yeah? Thanks, I'll keep that in mind. I would have thought it just a handy way of avoiding the subjunctive. But it seems more elegant, in any event.

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seancenarox

Is it just me or does "crois" sound too much like "quoi"?

March 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Don't your hear the R?

March 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

I don't blame seancenarox. After /k/ /R/ often becomes voiceless and sounds like /x/ in Loch Ness. /kxwa/ is almost indistinguishable from "crois"

March 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jytou

The female voice clearly pronounces the « r » but the male one is more like « kwa ». It is actually quite normal pronunciation.

March 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seancenarox

Honestly, they sound exactly the same to me. Maybe I just need to practice listening to the difference. I checked played the audio again and again, yet the sound very similar, if not the same,

March 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarrelDent

They do sound very similar. You know how a French "r" rolls at the back of your tongue? That rolling of the back of the tongue is the difference between the two. I looked up "crois" on Forvo and there are two examples, both by native French speakers. In one you can hear the "r", but the other sounds just like "quoi." So, obviously it's not always going to be clear from the pronunciation. But in a conversation it should be clear from context; since "croire" is a verb and "quoi" is a pronoun, they'll be used very differently.

March 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seancenarox

So the R sounds like the raspy sound between the "k" and the "wa"?

March 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarrelDent

Exactly! Often that's all there is of a French "r." Again, though, in a conversation, it's generally not a problem. In English, we chop off words and drop letters all the time, but your brain fills in the blanks. If a friend comes up to you and says "Whasup?" (or even just 'Sup?') you would know that he's asking you "what's up" from the context. With practice and listening to LOTS of conversational French, the same will be true in French.

March 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pokhriyalvishnu

If the translation has "I" twice, then shouldn't there be "je" twice?

March 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

You know translation doesn't work like that.

March 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veterisflammae

how come there's no preposition in this sentence? Is "je crois d'avoir lu ça" wrong?

November 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"croire" is one of the verbs that do not use a preposition to introduce another verb in infinitive. The full list: aimer/aimer mieux, aller, compter, croire, daigner, devoir, entendre, espérer, faire, falloir, (s')imaginer, laisser, oser, penser, pouvoir, prétendre, savoir, sembler, sentir, valoir mieux, venir, voir and vouloir.

November 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veterisflammae

Thank you! So for example you'd say: "je m'imagine être loin d'ici'" instead of "je m'imagine d'être loin d'ici'", right?

November 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

You're welcome! That is correct, yes.

November 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veterisflammae

Ok, thanks again!

November 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Just.Victoria

The CROIS sounds clearly as QUAND. 3.26.17.terrble recording

March 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jytou

It doesn't sound at all like « quand » to my French ears on either the Female or Male voices. It is not perfect, but quite intelligible. I'm not saying it's trivial, but that's what French is about. Oh and I use headphones, sometimes it makes a huge difference compared to PC speakers.

March 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Just.Victoria

i use my android w/o headphones. but thanks for the tip

April 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qmqq

why not 'Je crois avoir lu ce

April 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

Typically "ce" is not used on its own as the direct object of a verb, nor is it typically used as the object of a preposition.

There are some formal/literary exceptions.

April 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/korkaboin

Shouldnt this be "je crois que j'ai lu ça"?

April 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

This is another way of saying the same thing.

In this lesson, you are taught the past infinitive as a replacement for a subordinate clause, when the subject is the same as in the main clause. This is very convenient and common, notably when the subordinate clause requires the subjunctive mood.

April 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jytou

I believe this should be correct. Although there is an exact translation in English "I think that I have read that".

April 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BonBonChat

Keeps marking me wrong for putting the correct answer... ?? bug?

May 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VirginiaHy2

The word THAT is not available to choose which makes it impossible to answer correctly

May 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

Is "this" available?

May 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SWilliamsJD

When the app says "crois", I always hear "quoi". Any tips on how to differentiate those sounds.

June 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/petemehegan

Je quoi, is "I what!" British, maybe, but not English...On the other hand, don't despair, the "r" is the guttural "r" of German, a sound to which the English speaker must acclimate himself...over time. Patience is the key to language acquisition. Understand that what the Frenchman says makes sense..and is usually debatable. ;)

June 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leeviticus

can we just talk about how terrible the male voice is most of the time

July 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil949075

There is no "that" to select and I cannot type it in. This has happened several times in this part so it tells me, correctly, that it is wrong. I cannot do anything to rectify the error.

November 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaniKwon

What about "Je crois que j'ai lu ça" ?

January 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

It is correct as well.

January 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deborah853655

impossible to hear "lu" - played it ten times

February 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth870279

In spoken French does a leading "l" sometimes disappear? No matter how many times I listen to the recording, it sounds like "Je crois avoir u ça"

March 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

A leading "l" wouldn't disappear, as far as I know. It's possible that the audio's weird for this question, though I hear the "l" clearly when listening to the male voice that plays on the discussion page.

March 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oateasse

The audio omits 'ca'.

May 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charles667827

Why not: I think have read that

October 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tye890434

horrible sentence structure in english.

July 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steven229159

Finally, a situation where some type of reflexive grammar seems totally appropriate, and not a single freakin' reflexive verb in sight.

March 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

I listened to the French sentence several times played at both normal and slow speed, and each time I heard "Je crois avoir vu ca". What a nuissance!

April 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kishoreraj2003

"I think having read that" is not considered correct. Why?

February 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shrinkdad

Not sure what you're trying to convey. The only meaning I can give to your translation is something like, 'Since I have read that, I think', meaning that reading that set off some thinking process in me. Otherwise, I don't think it's a grammatically meaningful english sentence. It seems that that's not what the french construction is meant to convey.

February 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John787925

I did consider "I believe, having read that" - as in, having read some holy book, I've had an epiphany. I decided it was unlikely, but I'd be interested to know if it's a possible translation.

March 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mapwoman

Je crois que j'ai lu ça = Je crois avoir lu ça.

Meaning - I believe/think that I have read that.

It is just a shorter way of saying the same thing.

Look at above comments for a detailed explanation.

November 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shrinkdad

Yes, Mapwoman, but it doesn't mean what I think JohnnyE87 is getting at, i.e., that 'I believe BECAUSE I have read that.

November 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mapwoman

Exactly

May 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aidan6604

I think that a T at the end of crois (without the s) should be accepted

May 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mapwoman

But that is not how 'croire' is conjugated: Je crois, Tu crois, Il croit, Nous croyons, Vous croyez, Il croient.

May 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

Perhaps you are thinking it was just another typo which Duo often allows. I am not sure which group this example came from but all the comments on the page seem concerned with verb forms, infinitives etc. If the group was actually about proper management of verbs and you misspelled a verb in a short sentence, I am not surprised if they rejected it even though in another lesson they might have been more forgiving.

Either way, wrong case or misspelled, getting the verb right was the whole point of the example and your answer was clearly incorrect. .

May 14, 2016
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