"I am walking up the stairs."

Translation:Ich laufe die Treppe hoch.

July 10, 2014

92 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CliffJonesJr

Argh! This is what makes German hard. I have to remember "hoch" is part of the verb in this case and therefore goes at the end of the sentence. If it were a preposition (as it is in the English equivalent), then it would go right after the verb.

July 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dodecabilly

Yoda approves this

November 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannah_the_Great

Yoda's word ordering was very specific. If it was just any scrambling, no one would recognise the pattern or understand what he was saying.

He would say "Up the stairs, I am going", so rearranging the parts of this sentence in Yoda's order would be something more like "Die Treppe hoch, ich laufe".

No idea what the translators actually do with Yoda's speech in German though. Now I need to go watch Star Wars in German.

April 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ellablun

german joda approves of english too

October 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackhilger

But why isnt laufe at the end of the sentence along with hoch

July 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CliffJonesJr

The first (and in this case only) verb typically takes the #2 slot in the clause (usually after the subject, but possibly after another word like heute). If you had a helping verb like bin, then hochlaufen would become a participle, and you'd have something like this: Ich bin die Treppe hochgelaufen. (Somebody help me out if I'm off base here.)

Reference: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~german/Grammatik/WordOrder/WordOrder.html

July 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bynny2015

"If you had a helping verb like 'bin', then it would be, 'Ich bin die Treppe hochlaufen," I believe.' I'm sorry, CliffJonesJr, I don't think that's right.

When you refer to bin being a helping word, I'm not quite sure what you mean. But, if you mean a helping word, for transalting I am going up the stairs, then you need to keep in mind that English we can say, I go up or we can say, I am going up. But in German one says, ich gehe hoch.

If you were referring to forming the past tense using the Perfect form, it would be, "ich bin hochgelaufen." (most, but not all verbs in the Perfect tense inn German add a ge.

For example,

ich mache goes to ich habe gemacht.

ich laufe goes to bin gelaufen.

http://www.verbformen.net/conjugation/hochlaufen.htm

PS: I'm pretty sure that I have this right. But like CliffJonesJr, if I am not right, I hope someone corrects it!

August 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CliffJonesJr

Thanks for the correction! I was thinking of the perfect form; I just forgot the ge. I've adjusted my comment.

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bynny2015

You're welcome! I've made similar mistakes, too. Like you, I appreciate being corrected.

August 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Penderuxxekrieg

So, when an adverb is modifying a verb, it goes at the end of the sentence? And in this case the adverb is hoch, and the verb is laufen?

November 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CliffJonesJr

Not exactly. I don't believe hoch is considered an adverb here. I'd call it a "particle". In any case, it's part of the phrasal verb hochlaufen.

November 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Penderuxxekrieg

Okay, I think I understand :P

Thanks

November 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doug609981

I bin kaputt wenn ich die treppe hoch laufe. Is this correct?

April 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

in principle, yes. But you would usually consider "hochlaufen" as one word, so it should be "hochlaufe" in your sentence.

August 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whyspir

See, it would be nice if they would point out that hochlaufen is a verb. And separable. I was trying spazieren oben and ich gehe oben die Treppen...... no explanation for why they were wrong (which is a separate gripe). Your explanation clarified it entirely. Thanks!

July 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

You don't use "spazieren" inside a building. It is only used for "going for a walk".

And you can't use "oben" in the context of a movement. "oben" is static. The English word "up" has two meanings, one denoting a position (that would be "oben"), and one denoting a movement (from a downward position upwards). The latter is needed here and the respective German word is "hoch".

So you can say "Ich laufe die Treppe hoch" as well as "Ich gehe die Treppe hoch". But note the position of "hoch" at the end of the sentence.

And, in German you say "die Treppe" (singular) as the translation of "the stairs". The plural "die Treppen" would mean many staircases.

July 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/julidau

Vielen Danke

August 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFaulkn1

Didn't realise this at first - thanks

August 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CreativityBrain

Why " hoch cant come after verb hee?

September 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bleurabbit7

'hochlaufen' is considered a separable verb, thus putting 'hoch' at the end.

November 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rachel_Condie

??? So the verb is hochlaufen?

July 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanLeee

Yep! :)

July 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanStaats

Doesn't "laufen" mean "to run"? Hochgehen seems more correct in meaning "to walk up."

July 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanLeee

I think 'hochgehen' focuses more on the end destination. In other words, if you were wanting to say you were going upstairs. 'Hochlaufen' focuses more on the process of walking up the stairs, as in the sentence above. Are both not accepted here?

And 'laufen' does mean 'to run', however it's used a lot for what we'd say as walking in English.

July 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carla744071

"I have to run to the store." This doesn't mean you are literally running, it means you have to go quickly. I guess the German "lauf" is similarly idiomatic. At least, this will help me remember how to use lauf.

March 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

"laufen" is not identical in meaning to the English "run". This would be "rennen". "laufen" is the movement on two feet and can be translated to "run" or "walk", depending on context.

March 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColleenLogie

I got this wrong, then checked google translate and it used gehe...hinauf, which was marked correct for gehe but with hoch not hinauf. I'm confused.

August 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arisplus

A word of advice is to never use google translate, especially if you're translating from English -> German. Seriously. It will lead you astray more than anything.

February 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TKKG

Oh! That explains a lot. Hochlaufen have never appeared in the program before.

November 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zach1337

This is so confusing. Is this a separable verb? This is my first time seeing something like this (this first encounter also happens to be during a practice session too, not the lesson itself) and there has been no introduction to sentences like this.

August 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/petrpoulik

Another process of learning at DuoLingo is reading discussions. Take it as a positve step forward. Takes time but will eventually benefit you with the knowledge.

April 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MisssSandra

my thoughts exactly. Time to hit the books behind the scenes.

September 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BassamAyash

I am mixing up between Treppen (stairs) and Treppe (stair) .However, sometimes, stairs become Treppe without the (n)!!! How is that ?!

July 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CliffJonesJr

"Eine Treppe" refers to a staircase or a flight of stairs. In English, we typically refer to "stairs" as plural, without regard to units of stairs. "Treppen" refers to staircases, flights of stairs, or again simply "stairs".

July 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/supu1

"Ich gehe die Treppe hinauf" : isn't it right?

August 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KahHilzinEc

I wrote "Ich gehe die Treppen auf" and it corrected "auf" to "hinauf" so maybe it is accepted now?

January 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ItamarShap

In order to say "I'm going down the stairs" Would one say "Ich gehe/laufe die Treppe niedrig"?

November 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikolaRaicevic

What is the difference between Treppenstufe and Treppe?

December 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davoskan

How about: "Ich gehe die Treppe hinauf"? Which one would be more colloquial?

November 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DilksDeutsch

Would having the English sentence being "I am climbing the stairs", be much more helpful to this German translation, as that would indicate the action with merely the verb as this German sentence does?

May 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/muhaaas

What about "ich laufe bis zu die treppe?"

August 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpeedyNanner

I think that would mean something along the lines of "I walk/run up to the stairs". As in, you walk up to the stairs but don't actually start climbing them. And I think die Treppe would have to change to der Treppe in that case anyway, as zu takes the dative case.

September 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeoMan2

Doesn't need a preposition like auf or an?

November 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Atomic_Sheep

What's the difference between Laufe and gehe?

March 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

the verbs "to walk", "to go" and "to run" are not matching 1:1 to the German verbs "gehen", "laufen", rennen".
The easiest is "rennen", which is always "to run" (i.e. move on two (or more) feet in a high speed).
"gehen" means to move on two feet at a slow pace. This is usually translated by "to walk" in English.
"laufen" is on the one hand used for describing a movement (on feet) at an undefined speed or between "to walk" and "to run". So it could be a translation of "to walk".
On the other hand, when talking about the principal ability to walk (like in e.g. "the baby is learning to walk") it is always "laufen" in German.

The English "to go" stands for a movement from A to B, not necessarily on feet. In German you can use "gehen" only for a movement on foot, else you'd have to use "fahren".

August 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miorfaris

Why not die Treppen instead of die Treppe?

April 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dahlie5

Die Treppen is the plural of die Treppe. I suppose that would mean going up multiple staircases.

November 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fairydancer221

I see that "laufen" is "walking" in this sentence. I'm used to it being used more often as "run," and one of the online dictionaries marks it as "run" first and "walk" second. So, why is it "laufe die Treppe," but not "gehe die Treppe" or "hinaufsteige die Treppe"?

May 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smackythenerd

Why isn't it just Ich bin laufe hoch die Treppe?

February 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyaKotoka

"I am go up the stairs" isn't grammatical. In German one uses the simple present tense (e.g. gehe) to evoke the same meaning as the present progressive (e.g. am going) is used for in English. So, "I am going" is translated as "ich gehe" as opposed to say "ich bin gehe." Hope this is helpful.

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bekir978479

Would "Ich laufe die treppe hinauf" be O.K.?

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ichuk

But how to say i go down the stairs? I can't rely on Google translate. kleinlaufen? :)

March 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dahlie5

Ich laufe die Treppe hinunter.

November 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bogg22

Is niedriglaufen a verb for walking down?

April 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wickie-hey

it would be: hinunterlaufen

December 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KantaChand

The qestion should say fully correct translation and not translationS

June 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArzuAhmadova

isn't "ich steige die Treppe" more correct?

July 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_TX

Comment to revisit

August 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Solomiya327240

wwwhhaatt

January 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mebay91

The teach "laufe" which is walk then run. And I remember this word in both ways.

February 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alannahtxx

Wait so whats the difference between 'truppe' and 'treppe' ???!!

February 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john_cm

What does hoch mean?

May 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DilksDeutsch

It's part of the separable verb 'hochlaufen', so completes the verb 'laufe' second word in the sentence.

May 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheFangHui

Ack! I put "Ich bin laufe die Treppe hoch", as I was probably still sticking with english grammar.

Can someone explain to me what is "bin"? Is it not equivalent of the english " am"? I.e: "I am... =\= Ich bin..."

September 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

Of course the word "bin" in isolation means "am". But you can't translate sentences word by word. (if you did this, the Geman sentence would btw. be "ich bin laufend hoch die Treppen" (laufend (with a d at the end) is the literal tanslation of running). But the case is much simpler: in German there is no continuous/progressive form! So "I walk" as well as "I am walking" must both be translated to "ich laufe".

September 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheFangHui

Oh that's really helpful!

I thought that I just haven't come to learn continuous/progressive form!

Dankeschön!

September 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarpanova

Can I use steigen here?

November 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

you can, particularly if the stairs are steep. But this is not common and has the connotation of stressing the effort of climbing.

November 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mohelhageen

Genau, hochlaufen ist ein trennbar Verb

May 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthiusDiaz

I walk the stairs up.

June 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

no, this word order is not possible. Correct is "I walk up the stairs".

June 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JSavageIII

Why not "Ich laufe die Treppe aus"? In another exercise that was "he walked up the stairs" I think the German was "Er lauft die Treppe aus", at least as far as I can remember.

July 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

No, this is not correct and doesn't make any sense in German. Instead of "hoch" you can use "hinauf" or, in colloquial speech, "rauf".

July 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PranavTumk

Is hochlaufen a Trennbare verb?

July 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

yes

July 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shima.ramim

Is (laufe hoch) a verb by itself?

August 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

you can see "hochlaufen" as a separable verb, which splits if conjugated, so the "hoch" goes to the end of the sentence. This would be a positive answer to your question. Another possibility is to see only "laufen" as a verb. Then "hoch" is an adverb showing the spatial direction.

August 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SchonBaume

Why hoch is used here?

September 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

the German word "hoch" can either be an adjective (meaning "high" or sometimes "tall"), or an adverb which denotes a direction (from a lower level to a higher one, "up"). The latter is what is used here.

September 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sea-mist

urgh "You used the plural "Treppen" here, instead of the singular "Treppe". Ich laufe die Treppe hoch. "

This line is so confusing to translate as in English "stairs" are plural.

October 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talya69

Is "hochlaufen" really more wide-spread in this meaning then hochgehen or hochkommen? In my vocabulary hochlaufen has more technical meaning, like "speed up" some engine or "raise" (the prices) - something like that.

January 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

You can use "hochlaufen" as well as "hochgehen" in this situation. There might be a hint at the speed, because "gehen" is definitely at walking pace, whereas "laufen" might indicate running, but not necessarily so. Of course "hochlaufen" has the additional meaning you quoted, but nobody would think of this if you use it in connection with stairs.
You can use "hochkommen" only if you are at the "goal" end of the stairs and the person moves towards where you are.

January 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talya69

Thanks a lot

January 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ola79952

It's not a correct form to use.

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mOehlschlager

Why not, "Ich laufe auf die Treppe nach oben."?

May 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060
  1. If you use "auf" ypu have to use dative, because, though you are moving, it is not in the direction of the stairs, but the complete movement takes place on the stairs (static): "auf der Treppe".
  2. Though grammatically correct, it sounds odd and is usually not said this way. The only context I could imagine is after having said "Ich laufe nach oben" and somebody has asked you "How did you manage that? Which way did you take?".
May 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mOehlschlager

Okay, thanks. The German expression seems to be idiomatic, because the literal translation, "I walk the stairs high", or "I walk the stairs under" sounds odd to the English speaker.

May 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

It would sound less odd if you notice that "hoch" does not only mean "high", but "up" as well. Only the position of the "hoch" might be irritating.
The expression is not particularly idiomatic. "die Treppe hoch" is plainly "up the stairs" (in any context).

May 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelikaku

"Ich treppe die Treppen" was not accepted.

בס״ד

June 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1060

of course not. There is no verb "treppen".

June 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nyucleon

I typed "ich bin gehe auf treppen" which is way off lol, I need more practice

January 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Jesse-B-

So mad about the multiple words for walk and run.

February 11, 2015
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