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  5. "Ese gobierno no tiene límite…

"Ese gobierno no tiene límites."

Translation:That government does not have boundaries.

July 11, 2014

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/merrydew

I'm afraid that someone who translated "boundaries" as "limites" was not aware of the fact, that these words denote two completely different notions in mathematics (which is science, I assume). That's so deceptive. A limit (as in: lim sin(x) / x when x tends to infinity or an inverse limit in category theory) is "un límite". A boundary (in topology) of a set is the intersection of closure with closure of the complementary set (often denoted as bd), Spanish speakers call it "la frontera".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melarish

If it's talking about the UK government then it has no limits in how much it can cut public services.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bigolboone

I feel that gobierno should have been translated as "rule" here, its in the available definitions for the word, but the answer was rejected


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/barry_boettger

Having spent twenty years setting maximum acceptable limits for substances in drinking water I can easily relate to the complaint that "the government has no limits " (for substance x, y or z in drinking water.) or "no boundaries" when it comes to setbacks between a water source and a source of contaminants.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam274181

This is a bit confusing in science subject matter to be using a political example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarpoChico

How did this one slip in? It's about politics! This sort of thing happens all the time in Duo. It could be easily edited out...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phapthe

Estos cálculos científicos son muy precisos!!!!!!!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tishgab

why is "has" accepted, but "have" is wrong, when tiene is good for both?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CountessOfOle

"Tiene" only translates to have in cases where "usted" is the subject, because English does not have a distinction between formal and informal when it comes to the second person. It's all just "you have". Since "usted" isn't the subject here, and "government" is a singular third person noun, "has" is the only appropriate translation.

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