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"He goes in alone."

Translation:Él entra solo.

5 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AwkwardCactus

How/when should I use entra for goes in/enter instead of ...va en (goes in. I know that's not the right conjugation, I don't know it.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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This is one of those hair-splitting explanations that always cause trouble, but I will try and explain what I feel the difference is and will happily accept corrections.

My understanding is that there are two reasons why entrar is the verb here.

  • The first is that va en solo does not make sense because va en is used to describe how the mode of going or proceeding (va en serio: with seriousness/va en coche: going by car), or when it means that "he is going in" the action isn't directly modifiable and always needs to say what he is going into (va en la casa: going into the house).

  • Aside from that usage difference, entra solo is what makes the most sense here because the action we are modifying is the act of entry (his "going in", not his "going").

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I agree with your explanation, but there is a simpler one to give that has more universal application. In Spanish a preposition is almost always followed by a noun (with article if applicable) or an infinitive verb. The only exceptions have to do with phrasal prepositions where you may have two prepositions together like dentro de. So solo is not a word that the preposition can act on. English has separatable and non-separatable verb phrases which is a trait of Germanic languages. Romance languages also have phrasal verbs, but none which leave the preposition without an object or infinitive.

In many cases our Germanic phrasal verbs have related latinate verbs which can be cognates. Those words are generally better choices in Spanish. I don't think Spanish speakers would ever tend to say ir en instead of entrar en/a. They don't stand up, they raise themselves. They don't venir atrás or ir atrás, they volver or regresar. Most of these have either another single verb on Spanish or a different way to express the phrasal verb.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Great explanation though it took me a while to figure out what your saying (my lack of grammar knowledge being at fault here). It seems in my journey to learn Spanish I'm relearning English. Ay Dios Mio!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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People often don't really grasp grammar until they see some glimpse of comparative grammar. You language is so much a part of how you see and analyze things that, until you fully grasp that how you say things is not only not the only way to express something, it may not even be the best way. But once you see that things can be different, all this terminology for describing it suddenly has some merit. My understanding of these Germanic style verb/preposition separatable verbs like Go in and come in is not actually a product of either my English or my Linguistics knowledge, although it is somewhat informed by those. It comes from learning German in Germany. In German the preposition is attached to the beginning of the infinitive, but split and put at the end of the clause on most sentences. The minute I saw that, I understood something about English

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
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Gracias

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aglowish

I was wondering the same thing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Monolingual

What is the difference between "sólo" and "solo"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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"sólo" is an adverb that means "only". "solo" is an adjective that means "alone". Beyond that I do not know. How "only he goes in" or "he goes in alone" differs in meaning I do not know.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Orb
Orb
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only goes in means that's the only thing he does (as opposed to go in and start shooting). goes in alone means going in by himself. I think.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kekistanese
Kekistanese
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Wait a min, start shooting o_O ??? Shooting what, who ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/belleoftheballet

Sólo is also short for solamente

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikilobelite

When should I use entra instead of entre?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bbuhr

The intransitive verb entrar means "to enter" Entra is the second person singular conjugation. Entre is a preposition meaning "between" or "among" I had the same problem until I looked it up in the dictionary. I may have this problem again, but you have helped me to better understand it this time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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"Entra" is third person singular, or second person singular imperative. "Entre" can also be first and third person singular subjunctive.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samdyeraction

Brave man

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

Can't I put solo before entra? (Él solo entra)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jewliun

I think that means "He only goes in" or "He just goes in"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catwoman1212

I put el entra en solo, and they counted it wrong. Why is putting en wrong

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MinombreesDJ

Might it be due to "entra" or "enters" means going in? Thus, if you add "en", it becomes redundant.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClaireBD

Why would "se va solo" not be good ? Por favor :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Imagein

Se is a reflexive pronoun with no gender specification meaning himself/herself. The noun 'He'= Él (3rd person singular male)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajk123456

How is "El va solo" 'not' correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DvD29

In spanish there are 2 different "el" -El- is an article and it means "the" -Él- is a pronoun and means "he" and you must write it with the accent mark

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IshDude

I think ajk123456 meant the 'va solo' part of it, which would be because that is just he goes alone, which could be out or in or anywhere, but in this case he has to enter. Correct me if i'm wrong!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arefgee
arefgee
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Why not "solamente"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Imagein

I believe 'solamente' would translate to 'soley' (an adverb) not 'alone' (adjective) Correct me if I am wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amitkesher

Why can we not use "sola" instead of "solo" in this question ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IshDude

Because it's a he(sola is female)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brian680683

why is ingresar not acceptable here?; as in, "él ingresa solo"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I think that it is only that it would not be the common way to say it or one of Duo's core vocabulary words that it is trying to teach. But it should be acceptable. Duo will only accept words that they specifically program to accept, so if there are words that they teach that fit, like entrar, they are probably not going to accept an option that contains a word not in the vocabulary list without prompting. And then the problem becomes that a user whose major source of Spanish is Duo makes a mistake and is then given as a correct translation a word they have never seen before.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brian680683

Hmm... it's odd. Honestly I'm fluent in Spanish and hold a BA in the language. I really use the Spanish program here to sort of keep in shape as I actively learn Portuguese and Italian with duo. Still, it's my second language and I'm the first to admit that I make mistakes that a native speaker would not.

For me "él ingresa solo" sounds fine but I question myself because they marked it wrong. Your argument is fine but I would point out that if duo asks me to write "pen" in Spanish and I enter very specifically South American "lapicero" as opposed to the more universal "bolígrafo" or "pluma" I still am marked correct. So I figure either duo needs to update this or I am somehow incorrect in a way that a native Spanish speaker could hopefully explain.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes Duo us generally pretty good about including other synonyms, although they have to think of them first. I was probably a little more negative about the issue because I have been helping people who get confused on another question where Duo has begun to accept pedegogas instead of profesoras. It also suggests it as a correct answer which confuses people. I think there are quite a few Duo users who aren't familiar with the English words that are related like pedagogue and pedagogy. I would be more excited about Duo accepting new synonyms if it would keep the suggested answers (especially when there was an error) to the core answers that would fit the Duo "curriculum" The range of users that Duo has is quite broad in terms of age, native language, region, and previous/outside experience with the language. On the other hand my major complaint is that I don't think I have added a single word to my vocabulary from Duo. I went through the new story beta that they have. They kept asking me how they could improve but most of my comments were trying to get them to drill some of the vocabulary and expressions used in the stories.

1 year ago