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"Ellas estaban incluyendo a todo el país."

Translation:They were including the whole country.

5 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/daefenris

I tried "They were including the entire country", but it didn't like that. Is there a direct translation for "entire"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blackbirdfly

your answer works now

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kmst3

Seems to me that the personal "a" makes it the people in the country that are being included, not the land itself. Therefore I put "everyone in the country" and it was marked wrong. I wonder if I understood this incorrectly.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kishoreholla

I also have the same question. May be the verb incluir is always used as"incluir a"¡¡¡¡¡

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Great point, kmst13. I did not catch that. I put: They were including the entire country. (accepted)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hesolomon

I also said "used to include." Is that wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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the entire country sounds best to me and would cover people.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hesolomon

Glad you agree!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

I think that would be "incluían" not "estaban incluyendo." The latter is the imperfect form of "estan incluyendo" which means "they are including" so it make sense that you would need to have "including" in the imperfect form as well and just change the translation of 'estar' to match --> "were including."

Disclaimer: I'm trying to figure all this out too ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan_dos
Dan_dos
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Charge it to the limited capability of the translator engine.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rlpowell

What does this even mean? Like, in what context would you say "they included the entire country" ?

1 month ago