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  5. "Uisge-beatha blasta."

"Uisge-beatha blasta."

Translation:Tasty whisky.

February 25, 2020

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samantha782608

Whisky is tasty not acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silmeth

No, grammatically it’s a different sentence. Uisce-beatha blasta is just a noun phrase, tasty whisky, a tasty whisky – there’s no verb there.

Whisky is tasty would be Tha uisce-beatha blasta with the verb tha.

Also uisce-beatha is a masculine noun, but if it were a feminine one, like eg. cearc hen, chicken, the mutation pattern would change:

  • cearc bhlasta (bhlasta lenited) for a tasty chicken,
  • tha cearc blasta (blasta in its base form) for a chicken is tasty,

and it makes a difference with plurals too, eg:

  • coin mòrabig dogs
  • tha coin mòrdogs are big

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E-Gaelic_Garlic-

Thanks, this is helpful


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheBraveFalcon

Cha toil leam uisge-beatha idir


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pete670519

This gave me a LOT of trouble. The beginning starts off sounding like "Is…" so I'm expecting "Is toil leam.." etc. But then it doesn't come and it sounds something like "Is gu beatha blasta" which doesn't make sense at all. It's not a sentence construction that's even valid, or at least, not one I've learned yet (I'm not that far along at all).

That it's not a whole sentence threw me off. It's just a phrase but I was trying to parse it as a sentence so it didn't even occur to me for a really long time that it could start with anything but a verb.

Also doesn't help that I don't actually know what beatha means. I only know it as part of uisge-beatha, so that's (??)-water. (Fire-Water? Grain? Fermented? Alcohol?)

Anyway.. I got it eventually but this one is REALLY hard. Especially without any hints available as it just gives the recording and asked for a translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silmeth

Also doesn't help that I don't actually know what beatha means. I only know it as part of uisge-beatha, so that's (??)-water. (Fire-Water? Grain? Fermented? Alcohol?)

It’s water of life, life’s water, calque of Latin aqua vītae (beatha means life, it’s technically in genitive case, but in this word the genitive is the same as nominative). English whisky is a borrowing of this word (though English cropped it to just the first part, getting rid of beatha).

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