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  5. "Chan e leisgeadair a th' ann…

"Chan e leisgeadair a th' annam idir!"

Translation:I am not a layabout at all!

February 27, 2020

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pi5zZA0z

Wow - that is really fast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JayLozinsk

What does this phrase even mean? When would you use it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tj4234

a layabout is someone lazy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

It is well understood in British English. Maybe the term is not used so much in some other places. It is literally someone who 'lays about' instead of doing any work. They probably make lots of excuses, which is why the Gaelic is related to leisgeul 'excuse' and literally means 'excuser'. Leisg means 'lazy'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison920660

It can be used to criticise somebody for being lazy - eg parents nagging their children; or neighbours gossiping about each other. It's quite a mean thing to say so... the best approach is not to say it to anybody else!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christina6894012

I must be improving.. I got it right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morag482052

Why Chan e and not Chan eil?

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