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  5. "Come in, Fraser."

"Come in, Fraser."

Translation:Thig a-steach, a Fhrìseil.

February 28, 2020

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gaelynn8

Im not understanding. Why is it Thig a-steach, Fhionnlaigh, but Thig a-steach a Fhrìseil?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DMF86

I was wondering the same thing. At first i thought it changed depending on whether or not you expected a response from the subject, or if you were just saying it. Like "are you there, Jim?" compared to "Jesus, Jim, not in the fish bowl!"

...but now i'm confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

Because the vocative particle 'a' only goes in when the following name/noun in the vocative does not start with a vowel sound (because two vowels together is often bad, why we use 'an' before vowels in English). Fionnlagh is f+vowel at the start which when lenited to Fhi the fh bit goes close to silent leaving the start of the name with a vowel sound, so the 'a' isn't put in front. But for the other name it's not F+vowel but F+consonant, Fr so when lenited Fhr doesn't start with a vowel sound, so the vocative article 'a' stays in. Does that help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kanders9

I am also wondering when to use an "a" before name snd when not to


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneMacken3

I put in Thigh a staigh. Thats what Ive heard locally over the years.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tj4234

I think you've confused what you've heard. No dialect (certainly none in Scotland) would say it like that. A-staigh infers you are stationary. It means "inside" as in "I am inside the house".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

a-steach for direction, a-staigh for position. Same for a-mach and a-muigh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ionnsaiche

You will hear thig a-staigh from native speakers in/around Barra. It's a known tell for the dialect.

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