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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoyMcLella

What is the best way to go through the lessons?

There are 5 levels for each module (Please excuse me if I'm using the wrong terms). Is it best to do complete all the modules on level 1, then start again at level 2, etc. Or should I stick to module 1 until I've completed all the levels, then move on to module 2? Or is it just a "whatever works best for you" kind of situation?

Just wondering which is the best strategy for retention from people who have done this before.

March 9, 2020

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zia177448

This is what duolingo suggests: https://making.duolingo.com/whats-the-best-way-to-learn-with-duolingo

I usually stick to something similar: a mix of repetition and new things, a few lessons at each level which I gradually take to higher levels.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morag_Kerr

I disagree with the suggestion that you should complete every module sequentially, because I did that before I realised the drawback. There is a huge problem with Duolingo because you actually can't do what one poster said and "after a few days redo the lessons you already did."

The lessons that take you from the fourth crown to the fifth one are the most challenging there are. They're entirely free-text input, no word tiles and no "click this helpfully labelled picture of the word" and no simple one-word answers. I assumed that the "practice" lessons after the 5th crown had been achieved would be at a similar level of difficulty. They're not.

Once you have a gold skill, at the 5th crown, the practice lessons you get are substantially dumbed down. You're back to clicking on obvious pictures and obvious multiple choice questions and word tiles that pretty much tell you the answer (although you can switch these off). You waste a lot of time on "click on the picture that is 'girl'" and "type the Gaelic for 'ball'" and "is the word for 'bridge' 'drochaid' or 'droch fhaid'" (or something like that), to get maybe two questions that really test and reinforce your learning.

I think you should cherish the higher-level questions and make use of them sparingly, not use them all up in a hurry and then lock yourself out of them forever. It's even worth crashing out of a high-level lesson near the end so you can do it again and again until you've really got it (even though you won't get XP if you don't complete it) because once you've completed it it's gone forever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zia177448

True, I should have mentioned the level 4 -> level 5 problem as well!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosariaBarbie708

Hi Roy! the most efficient way to learn is: do the five levels of each lesson, after a few days redo the lessons you already did.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ernavill

I have to agree with this, the most efficient way of learning is to complete a single module to level 5. This way you focus on a few words within a single context and repeat them a lot, which is far more effective than doing more words but only seeing them once or twice.

That being said, it might not be the most fun way to learn. This is why Duolingo recommends alternating between new lessons and working older lessons up. To maintain motivation.

So you should decide for yourself which method works best for you. And obviously there's nothing stopping you from giving both a try. Start out with one method, and if you get bored / stuck, switch to the other one. Or come up with your own method. Everyone learns differently.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morag_Kerr

I'm going to disagree, although in a separate post.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morag_Kerr

By the way, look at the replies on this thread. https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/36978047


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hajo_T

Depends a lot on your way of learning. I decided to do a skill from 1 to 5 and hope the words and grammer stick. It helps a lot with grammer, because later on I remember which skill the word was in and can relate it to the gender. The grammar explanations are sometimes a bit thin (don't worry about this just now ...).

Important advise: If you have several skills on one level, always work left to right. Otherwise you will miss some of the grammer and have a hard time until you come across the explanation two skills later.

For me, the "restore" exercises work very well. I always think: Òbh òbh, I completely forgot about this word, but well, I still understand it. Drathais ...

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