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  5. "An t-eun buidhe."

"An t-eun buidhe."

Translation:The yellow bird.

March 10, 2020

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rick891171

This speaker’s accent seems different from most - the ’t’ in ‘an t-eun’ sounds to me more like a soft ‘g’ sound, such that ‘an t-eun’ sounds almost like “an jean”. Is this a particular regional pronunciation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

The standard pronunciation varies between /tʲ/ (like the t in tube) and /͡tʃ/ (like the ch in cheese). The only difference between the sound you describe, /͡dʒ/, and /͡tʃ/ is the voice. That means that they are exactly the same as far as you mouth is concerned, but your vocal chords vibrate for /͡dʒ/. In any language, including Gaelic, there is a lot of variation of voice, d ↔ t, g ↔ c, b ↔ p, etc. so this would not be unusual. But there is a particular feature of some dialects of Gaelic which is a distorted remnant of nasalization, a mutation still found in Irish, that leads to voicing after the article an. You will hear this on other sentences, and see a lot of people confused by this in the discussion.

So the short answer is: yes, probably from Lewis or nearby.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatrionaNicDhana

This sounds like the b in "buidhe" is silent, even though it's not lenited. What's with this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SrGI2aed

even those Gaelic consonants that seem straightforwardly mappable onto English consonants are not quite the same - they are often 'softer' or 'weaker' than their English equivalents - the b is there, it's just much softer than you'd expect, and merges into the n. Your ear eventually gets used to this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatrionaNicDhana

Thanks. I'm usually OK with these subtleties and able to hear them. This one just seemed really different from any I'd heard before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Baudouin440236

I hear a g or k sound in front of the article, which I haven't met before. I guessed that the word would be "an", but these additional consonants thrown in without any real explanation about dialect differences are quite confusing.

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