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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sarahkhan357514

PULVIS ET UMBRA SUMUS

we are all made of dust and shadows comment your favorite latin phrase and its meaning

March 21, 2020

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanOleA

I am currently reading Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata to continue learning Latin after finishing the tree on here, and found this one really funny for some reason:

"Quī volare vult neque potest, ad terram cadit."
"He who wants to fly and cannot, falls to the ground."

So that is currently my favorite one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Sunt lacrimae rerum, et mentem mortalia tangunt. (Vergil, Aeneid I. 462) It's completely untranslatable, but means something like: "Here is felt the sadness of human affairs; and the facts of human life touch their minds." Aeneas has just seen the scenes of the Trojan War--the sufferings of his own people--depicted on the walls of the temple of Juno being built in the new city of Carthage. This reassures him about the kind of people who live there, and the sort of reception they'll get: these people must be kind and welcoming, if they appreciate the sorrow and pity of Troy.

C. S. Lewis translated: "Life has its tears and men's mortality its sting."

Allen Mandelbaum: "there are tears for passing things; here, too, / things mortal touch the mind."

You get the idea!


[deactivated user]

    Semper ubi sub ubi Always where under where

    See, it makes sense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan778044

    Your opening phrase reminds me of the priest says in the Traditional Latin Mass on Ash Wednesday as he puts the ash on our foreheads.

    Memento, homo, quia pulvis es, et in pulverem reverteris.

    Remember, man, that thou art dust, and unto dust shalt thou return.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spalmaer

    "Intus omnia dissimilia sint, Frons populo nostra conveniat"

    Inside, may everything be different, Outside, let's align with our people. -Seneca, Letters to Lucilius, about the best behavior of the philosopher


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max_____

    I love Seneca letters. They are full of wisdom.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

    Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum videtur.

    Anything said in Latin sounds profound.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aqilokoq

    :))
    Yeah, that's the way it is.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zia177448

    Hic sunt dracones. - Here be dragons. (Used on old maps (or at least on one surviving old map) to denote unexplored territory.)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/note2607

    Thank you very much! You're right - there is unfortunalely only one surviving old map with the text HIC SUNT DRACONES.
    It's a text on the famous Hunt–Lenox Globe.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Here_be_dragons
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hunt–Lenox_Globe


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Papualaisooppera

    Lingua mortua lingua optima. - It's better not to translate that.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max_____

    Corruptio optimi, pessima

    The best, when corrupts, becomes the worst.

    In Spanish = La corrupción de lo mejor se vuelve lo peor.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

    Timor mortis conturbat me. -- Fear of death disturbs me.

    I think this is really Vulgar Latin, or possibly Late Latin, as I got it from a poem written by a Scotsman in the 15th century. But it's Latin nonetheless. Also, to me it means the fear of death that others have disturbs me.

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