"Rìs milis."

Translation:Sweet rice.

March 23, 2020

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Sweet rice does not mean anything in English. To ensure it was not just my dialect I Googled it and it only came up with oriental dishes (which do not resemble rice pudding) and Spanish/Portuguese dishes (which do) such as Spanish/Mexican arroz con leche 'rice with milk' or Portugese arroz doce 'sweet rice'.

Assuming it means 'rice pudding' (which I cannot find evidence for) then please translate as such. If it means something else, please translate as that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

It just means 'sweet rice'. As in, rice that is sweet. As opposed to salty rice, sour rice, cold rice, etc. Nothing more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

FYI Joanne, this thread is all in answer to someone who claimed it did mean 'rice pudding'. Now that that post has been deleted, the whole thread looks a bit pointless. I think everyone now agrees that it means 'sweet rice'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John362626

I suspect "rice pudding" in Gaelic is something else. Maybe this is one of those randomly generated combinations of noun and adjective. But would "arroz doce" not mean "rice pudding", if "sweet rice" "does not mean anything in English"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivitcyex

Milseag-rìs is rice pudding.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Yes, that makes sense and I would understand if someone said that to me. Have you heard that it did you find out in a book?

Now in English there is no hyphen, but I think you do use them more in Gaelic. Does anyone know any rules for when to use them in Gaelic?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

I think you put an extra not in

But would "arroz doce" not mean "rice pudding"?

If so, you can edit it out.

What I think from the internet and my own experience (but happy to hear from anyone who knows different) is that the use of arroz doce or similar to mean 'rice pudding' is specific to Spanish and Portuguese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

As far as I can see from the internet, creamed rice is usually used, in some dialects including Scots, as a synonym for rice pudding. As such it has already been argued it is the wrong translation. It can also refer to a savoury dish, mainly in oriental cuisine, and that is also wrong here.

The main issue is that this sentence is causing confusion and leading people to think it means 'rice pudding'. That is sufficient reason to remove the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesOHare8

that's what I said, sweet rice. Is it wrong, is it right, what do you mean here??

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