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"Es casi una hora antes."

Translation:It is almost an hour before.

5 years ago

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cquark
cquark
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Standard American English would probably have something following "before" -- "It is almost an hour before the curtain rises," "It is almost an hour before her departure time." Without something following "before," most American native speakers would say "earlier."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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There's one case where we'd stop at "before", where there was a question about whether something is before or after.

Q: Is the speech before or after the parade? A: It is almost an hour before.

Can the original Spanish sentence have that meaning? "Es casi una hora antes."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laya_a
laya_a
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This spanish learning app is really helping my English. Thanks cquark.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acalleyne

verdaderamente, mi ingles es mejor

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I agree. Even it's obvious what we're talking about, we'd still say something following "before".

Is the curtain going to rise soon? It is almost an hour before it does.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenGarman

agreed. Us brits too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TalBerman

Exactly what i 've just sent on remarks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/myeurop

why is: "it's almost one hour earlier" wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tardisman86

I'd say earlier suits better...cause you should specify before WHAT!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UnGringoTravieso

I agree with you. To me an hour before or earlier is the same thing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quinn_Miller

earlier is temprano.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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"Más temprano" actually.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/limenchilli

Is there a better translation than "It is almost an hour before."? That's not good English, but I couldn't think of anything better than direct translation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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The Spanish sentence is a bit weird too, the first thing that came to my mind was time travelling. BarbaraMorris' example works well though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tardisman86

it is almost an hour earlier

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PoetryOtter

The sentence in English makes little sense, standing alone like that. Bad English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maxinedev

I wrote "It is almost an hour early" but it was marked wrong. This answer "It is almost an hour before" makes absolutely no sense without some kind of context, or something following "before".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Duolingo often uses sentences which need some prior context. That's part of the fun, figuring out how to make the sentence make sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redneckray

I answered "it's almost an hour earlier"--don't do it

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/circumbendibus
circumbendibus
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I'd probably say "an hour till". That's most natural in the only context that comes to mind.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NiketJoshi

Why almost an hour ago is wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tardisman86

cause ago is in the past!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gnorian

Would "It's almost an hour early" work as a translation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I don't think so; "temprano" means "early".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SandySandfort

I wrote "It is about and hour before." It was marked as incorrect, but it is not according to the dictionary definition of "casi."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I only see "just about" as one of the definitions of "casi". "About" can mean a bit before or a bit after, but I think "casi" only means a bit before.

What dictionary are you using?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nonick13
nonick13
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I wonder if "almost" is a correct translation for "casi". In this case, "almost"=less than an hour, while "casi"= approximately, about, more or less. Am I wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I don't think "casi" has the sense of "approximately". It implies "less".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nonick13
nonick13
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Thank you Barbara, I think you are right :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inthetropics

I tried." It is almost an hour ago". Is that way off?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I don't think "ago" is correct here. "hace" is the Spanish for "ago".

"hace" and "ago" are about a time before now. "antes" and "before" are about a time before some other time.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-HystErica-
-HystErica-
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Una muy buena explicación - gracias!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jsab1

Hi, I wrote "It's almost an hour past", as I saw that antes could also mean "in the past". Is that not an acceptable translation

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TalBerman

YOU should have used the right past form: almost an hour has passed. The way you used it, does not exist is English. It's almost an hour (OK) + past (outside of context). The word PAST cannot be used without conjunctions.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ann2312

It is almost an hour ahead was marked wrong sadly

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lunabunso

is there sentences wrong ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SD-1
SD-1
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Before what?? Are there are simple usages for the Spanish sentence that do not drop a word just for brevity, or would the question "?Antes de qué?" be as logical to follow in Spanish as its English counterpart? "Almost an hour before", so dropping the 'es', would make sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pantstheterrible

Would "It's almost an hour away" fit?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robin_Lampert

I would have said, "It is almost an hour beforehand."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lousybreak

Geez, try to say that 5 times fast...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WodgerWabbit

Because "before" suggests an event to follow I tried "It is almost an hour to go" which was rejected. Is that wrong? The most natural way to me in English would be "There is almost an hour to go".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gorg346283

In English that's not a sentence. It's a clause in need of an object. "It is almost an hour before | dinner" "It is almost an hour before | the movie starts." Either that or i am totally missing the meaning?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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It's a complete sentence if it follows a question that establishes what "before" refers to. If the previous sentence in the conversation was "When is dinner?", it would more natural to say "It is almost an hour before." than "it is almost an hour before dinner."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gorg346283

Actually no. In that case you would properly leave off the word before as well as the object.
"When is dinner?" "Almost an hour." With the "from now" implicit.

English tends to center on the present rather than the event.

"When is dinner?" "Almost an hour before." would, if anything, imply that dinner was an hour ago and the questioner missed it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abby195681

Why canT they have an english version so that people can learn my way of speaking this app is rubbish sometimes

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/prleet

This brike my brain cells, if you break them, you buy them.

1 month ago