"It is almost an hour before."

Translation:Es casi una hora antes.

5 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LeonMarkla

Never mind. looked it up. Antes - before in time. Ante - before in space

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

For those that are using cell phones...I know you didn't get the write up at the beginning of the chapter.

Tips and notes

Ser versus Estar

One of the hardest things to learn about Spanish is the distinction between the verbs "ser" and "estar," since in English they both mean "to be."

By now you should be familiar with the conjugations of "ser," such as in "él es un niño" (he is a boy), "yo soy un hombre" (I am a man), and "ustedes son mujeres" (you are women). "Estar" is also an irregular verb, and its different conjugations in the present tense are below:

"Ser" refers to what something is, while estar refers more to what something does. For example, "estoy enfermo" would mean "I am being sick" or "I am currently sick." On the other hand "soy enfermo" translates to something closer to "I am a sick person" or "I am sickly." Below are more examples:

Estoy feliz = I am currently happy Soy feliz = I am happy by nature Estoy cansada = I am currently tired Soy cansada = I am a tired person Él está callado = He is being quiet Él es callado = He is introverted

You can think of "ser" as being equivalent to "equals." Alternatively, you can think of "estar" as refering to a temporary condition, while "ser" frequently refers to a permanent condition. However there are some exceptions. For example, "ser" is used in expressions of time, such as "son las cuatro de la tarde" (it's 4 in the afternoon). Also, "estar" is used to indicate someone has died, so "he is dead" would be "está muerto."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cuylerotsuka
cuylerotsuka
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I wrote above about "ser" being related to essence and "estar" to state, and I think your examples are great that we could apply that to. ("Essence" etymologically comes from "essere", and "state" comes from "stare".)

Él es un niño. – "Es" here refers to the essence of the person; the child is young and of the male gender.

Soy enfermo. – "Soy" here indicates that sickness has become an essential part of that person's being. In everyday conversation, of course, it likely refers to someone who's confined to a hospital bed or is noticeably sick and unlikely to get better.

Estoy enfermo. – "Estoy" here indicates that the state of being of that person is currently sick, although, like you said, not permanently. Emphasis here, though, is on a state of being rather than the essence of that person.

Soy feliz. – Happiness is part of my essence or nature.

Estoy feliz. – Although happiness isn't necessarily part of my essence, the state of my being is happy.

There are many, many parallels between "ser as permanent/estar as temporary" and "ser as essence/estar as state", but, like you said, there are many exceptions to the former that aren't exceptions to the latter. ("Está muerto" being the most glaring one.)

Cheers!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deadinibiza

Why not Está casi?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
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I think speaking about time, it has to be es. That's just how it is.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anujjie

es = permanent esta = temporary

and we all know time is not changing

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cuylerotsuka
cuylerotsuka
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Close; "ser" describes the nature of something (the essence, if you will) and "estar" describes the state of something (including location and emotion). In this case, time is part of the nature of something, so we use "ser". ("Son las diez", for example. Even though it's not 10:00 permanently, time itself is an essence of the human condition.) Where "estar means temporary" goes wrong is in a sentence like "Él está muerto" — someone's being dead isn't temporary 99.9% of the time, but "muerto" describes the state that person is in.

When it all boils down though, these things are all socially constructed. Even so, it helps to know how to navigate them!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kama410

This is the best explanation I have read for the difference anywhere.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElleLingo

Before what? I don't think that the English sentence makes sense... I don't want to report it though in case there's an example I haven't thought of. I would have thought it would be 'it's almost an hour earlier' or 'it's almost an hour before I have to go home'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dimitree1

I guess this can work in a conversation: Q: Is it bedtime yet? A: It's almost an hour before. In the answer the word 'bedtime' is implied.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElleLingo

Thanks, I know it technically makes sense but I would never answer like that. I'm sure most people would say "in about an hour". "Almost" doesn't sound right with "before" anyway when talking about time. "It's about/almost an hour away" sounds okay but I've never heard Duo's example and I think there is a better way to word this in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lavacakes

I don't understand why for this sentence, it is "es casi" when for the previous sentence, it was "son casi" for saying "It is almost seven / Son casi siete"... can anybody explain this? I got them both wrong because the first one I said "es" and then thought I learned my mistake so for the second one I said "son" and that was wrong still hahaha

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Balaur
Balaur
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It depends on the time. For any number above one, you use 'son', but for 'una', you use 'es'.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lavacakes

That makes so much sense. Thank you!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hakeembailey

See, that's why I follow you, man! Haha you answered my question even though I didn't even reply with one.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dpatkat

Son is plural. Es is singular.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeonMarkla

I know this is probably obvious but why antes not ante?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Ante is physical placement. Antes is before as in time. One thing happens before another.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dpatkat

I must learn difference así and casi

2 years ago
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