"Goedendag,sap."

Translation:Good day, juice.

4 years ago

71 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Lavinae
Lavinae
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Some sentences are supposed to make you laugh.
A dull course is merely demotivating ^_^.

And yes, I have talked to my breakfast on occassion...
What are you to do when you don't have any pets? ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickM98
NickM98
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Just wondering. Could this be a really rude form to ask for a juice as well? Haha, I thought it might mean that before your comment.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JosephAldenMoore

Good day, juice. We meet again.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sweater-strypes

"The Good, the Bad, and The Ugly theme starts playing"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DylanSmith2017

Or, as I quietly approach a snack cart on a busy Amsterdam street I exclaim "HAHA! GOEDEMORGEN OLIEBALLEN!"

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneZL
ReneZL
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That is what I thought. Suppose your Dutch is very basic, you just arrived in Amsterdam by plane, it is the morning, the waiter is asking what you would like: "goedendag, sap". I would order somehow like that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/littleblueduck
littleblueduck
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This could be a little less rude if you imagine it being an answer: - Hello, what would you like to order? - Hello, juice. But yes, probably a tourist who forgot the word "please".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tabz6

Or you could say "Goedendag, ik wil sap."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nuvatak

Or "Goedendag, sap alstublieft."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lavinae
Lavinae
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Yes, you could interpret it that way. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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I think you're right on this one. Although, the rudeness is culture-depedent. I feel bad for people who have an actual question about grammar who have to wade through dozens of people saying 'Hurr-hurr! I'm too dense to parse English or Dutch.'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rilianxi
rilianxi
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There's no grammar here. It's not a sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Not all communication comes in complete sentences. "Goedendag, sap" is a complete statement. School teaches us a way to communicate. It does not teach us the only way to communicate. :)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelWor9
MichaelWor9
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True, also it's good to throw in complete surprises. In regular speech weird combinations actually come up a lot.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/therahmonster

And a goedendag to you too, brood.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sr.Stephen
Sr.Stephen
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I assumed I was speaking to a waiter: "Good day, what will you have?" "Good day, juice (please)"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cinnamonquill

I want to learn how to say "this juice was murdered" in Dutch.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexmschatz
alexmschatz
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Dit sap werd vermoord.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danita8705

Ha! I played that over so many times thinking, surely they aren't saying juice?? After this I shall not second guess what I think I'm hearing so much. Thanks for the laugh, hope I find more!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spaceowl42

I do that same thing! I'm like "it can't be that!" And turns out it is. :-) this sentence is so funny! :-D happy learning! -Spaceowl42

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krinadoodle
Krinadoodle
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I can just imagine the scene: ME: Good day, juice. JUICE: Good day, Krinadoodle. ME: AAAAH YOU"RE NOT SUPPOSED TO TALK BACK!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicolaeComan
NicolaeComan
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At ''goedendag'' the ''n'' is pronounced? I don't hear it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/faith46
faith46
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Neither do I, I just go with how they say it and try to remember it for the next time it crops up.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berkamin

Before introducing all the words with the letter G, it would really help if you would explain some of the pronunciation ahead of time. Until the pronunciation is explained a bit, hearing all those -ij combos and g pronounced like h leaves the novice with a lot of cognitive dissonance.

Also, I have a historical linguistics question: how did Dutch end up with g having the h sound? For two adjacent letters to have the same pronunciation seems really odd to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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Well, sounds don't change in languages based on their closeness in the alphabet, as writing is secondary to spoken language.

Short answer: it's not that strange. The sound you're hearing isn't a h, it's what might be written in English as gh. The sound typically represented by the letter g is a voiced velar stop and the sound you're hearing here is a voiced velar fricative. The main difference is that the second has less tension at the back of the mouth.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dim-ond-dysgwr

As ataltane says, Dutch g and h are not in fact the same: in je hoed is goed (your hat is good) hoed and goed have different sounds: Dutch h is like English h; Dutch g is articulated with the same part of the tongue as English g but (not to be too technical about it) the sound is "scraped" rather than being a complete stop-and-release.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/V.Devilus
V.Devilus
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Is it hoo.den.dah or hoo.de.dah ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sumtimez

It is pronouned ɣujəˈdɑx

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chelsey339220

Its always very polite to talk to the things your about to snack on!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Hi Chelsey, please remember that volunteers have to clean the forums and there are over 300,000,000 users on Duolingo. When people leave casual comments that aren't asking a question related to the sentence or answer it, it creates clutter. When everyone does that, it consumes thousands of volunteer hours a year. Here are some Tips for using the Sentence Discussions. Thanks!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chelsey339220

Thanks for telling me!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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No prob! After posting this, I realized this whole sentence discussion was full of casual comments. It can certainly be confusing how to use the SDs when they get cluttered. I can see how you got the wrong impression. The desktop website has a discussion forum that, while still for discussing language, is not nearly as constrained as the SDs. https://forum.duolingo.com/ :)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lvderhelm_

I am confused. Is it supposed to be a joke. Haha. I dont really get it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krinadoodle
Krinadoodle
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Yes, it's a joke. You're not supposed to talk to juice...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neptunium
Neptunium
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Why are both "Hello" and "Good day" accepted for "Goedendag", but not "bye"? "Good day" in English only means "goodbye", and never "hello". If "Goedendag" only means "hello" and not "goodbye", then "good day" should not be listed as a possible translation of "goedendag"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/knittingarch

Native English speaker here. Good Day can be used for both hello and goodbye. Granted it's a bit more formal as hello and used much more rarely than it used to be. Think of Jane Austen for usage: "Good day, sir. Lovely weather we're having."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boudicababe

Good day is a generally greeting in English. We did used to use this as a polite hello but has now fallen out of common use. It is technically correct.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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This is Dutch, not English. So, maybe the Dutch don't use "good day" for both greeting and farewell like it is in English. I'm not saying this for certain, as I'm new to the language. But, it's good to keep in mind that phrases don't always carry identical function from language to language. :)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yession
yession
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does "sap" mean something else in Dutch?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LorantZsig

This makes no sense at all. Who would say this?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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LorantZsig,

I can imagine a server at a restaurant "Good morning, what will you have today?" "Good morning, juice." But that is not so much the point. Phrase books can be handy if all one wants to do is learn to parrot a handful of phrases. That isn't the same as learning a language. Duolingo uses a strategy that discourages us from becoming parrots. It pushes us to learn how the language actually works. Then, we can mine the sentences in our courses for material to construct original sentences. The user Labaradore1 recently put it best in another discussion:

"Today the spider lives between the radio and the plastic giraffe."

I still remember a lesson from second-year French which was deliberately nonsensical: "Il est luthérien, mais il aime les fleurs."

Let's assume that sentence was in an English for _ course. It has in it:

An adverb of time
Definite articles (some languages don't)
A present-tense verb
A preposition (some languages don't have prepositions in the way IE-speaking people conceive of them)
An adjective
A conjunction
"Today the spider lives between the radio and the plastic giraffe."

Put it all together and you have a perfectly cromulent sentence, just like many of the perfectly cromulent sentences I've been exposed to in the four languages I'm working on in Duolingo, only one of which I've had any real previous exposure to.

For the sneerers, if the vocabulary and the overall subject matter of the sentence is kind of silly, ridiculous, or impractical, it's probably not aimed at teaching you vocabulary. What's the sentence doing in terms of exposing you to syntax, grammar, even spelling or pronunciation in your target language?
"Il est luthérien, mais il aime les fleurs."
(Comment source Labradore1)

I hope this helps illustrate the value of the very many quirky sentences you'll encounter as your progress through your courses on Duolingo. ^_^

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deizenov

What

1 month ago

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