1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Dutch
  4. >
  5. "Een jongen is een kind."

"Een jongen is een kind."

Translation:A boy is a child.

July 16, 2014

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Popp2

I'm so glad the "een" doesn't have multiple forms like in French!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DXLi

My, this sounds quite similar to German. I'm already getting the words confused!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/9beylu

Dutch and German share about 75% of their vocabulary. They're very closely related.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SvenDK

On the grammar side you will soon see the difference. And be carefull with some words, they all of a sudden mean something different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Markmcopc

The lists of false friends in Dutch with German is even longer than the one for Dutch with English. Speaking all three you're bound to occasionally draw from the wrong box now and then, probably with amusing results. "Hij is kind." "Ja, zeer erg."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardiMonkey

Already I think I'm learning German! I know how you feel...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/missmzr

Native Dutch and English speaker here and bess these words are really similar my advice is to listen to the pronounce these Dutch and German both sound different. : )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jazzyrat1

Agreed but i don't find it confusing just practise


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MohammedPa3

I'm a little hard on hearing, just to make sure - is 'kind' pronounced 'kint'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/goshgollygod

Yes, the letter 'd' will usually make a 't' sound at the end of words.


[deactivated user]

    This is so much like Afrikaans. I'm lucky I can understand this =) this is gonna be a breeze.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElizabethL43447

    Afrikaans developed from dutch. The dutch colonized part of Africa during the early trade days


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adri449462

    I'm Afrikaans but also fluent in English and this is basically a mixture between the two, I love this.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lydiadaisy_x

    I am struggling with the "een"- sometimes it means a, and sometimes it means the.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VarneyGary

    "een" is "a, an," but "en" means "and."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RJ_G

    een usually means "a" or "an" But, depending on context, it can also mean "one" (the number). In the case of it meaning "one" it is usually written with an accent mark over both "e"s.

    "The" is restricted to "het" and "de."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam758451

    This feels like some strange hybrid between German and English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/em-cu

    I find it really similar to Danish gosh this is going to be hard. At least I have somethign similar to work off of, though!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathi270804

    This is so easy for me bc German has so similar sound and words


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/April_Luo

    why" one boy is one kid" is wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grumblestache

    Just starting out so I'm not an expert with this by any means, but from what I understand:

    "een" = "a"

    and

    "één" = "one"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gekko2508

    I can confirm this. Most of the time this has more to do with the spoken Dutch. Colloquially, you often forget the accents when writing. When speaking, however, the two e's in "één" is pronounced like the "ay" in "hay", whereas the unaccented e's tend to sound like "uh" for the article "een".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bananaheadjjo

    do you pronounce the 'h' in het? or is it just uht?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StefvanSchie

    You do, the 'h' in 'het' isn't silent.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/haroldnaranjo

    when is ( is ) taken as a has or has been?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maktaz

    I assume you mean the past tense form for 'is'?

    The full verb is 'zijn' as in 'wij zijn mannen' (we are men). The past tense of 'zijn' is 'was' and 'waren' (singular and plural respectively). The present perfect is 'geweest', but you'll get to these things later :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lizsnop

    Is it just me or "is" sounds like "ish"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orthohawk

    Think Sean Connery :). The English "s" is what's called a "laminate" consonant, that is, it's made with the blade of the tongue right behind the tip making friction against the alveolar ridge (the gums above and behind the top teeth). The Dutch "s" (I believe) is more of an "apical", that is, the very tip of the tongue is used to make the friction with the alveolar ridge. Northern Spain's "s" has the same "thick" sound.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathewLim

    When do we use het when do we use de


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yopigous

    I don't think there is a particular pattern or way to know when to use "het" or "de" before a noun. You just have to memorize the objects which use "het" and the objects which use "de". My mom used to speak Dutch fluently, and she and others on Duolingo say that you just have to memorize which words use "het" or "de". It's hard, I know, but practice makes perfect :P


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielingua

    Wait, I typed in "The boy is a child." and I got it wrong? It said the translation was "One boy is a child."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverBens1

    It's because Een jongen means A boy, not the boy. The boy would be De jongen. Hope that makes sense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverBens1

    Can you use "is" for "has" and "has been"? For example, would it be correct to say: "De jongen is een kat"? I'm guessing that would be incorrect, but I'm wondering because hovering over "is" in the sentence, suggests it could be translated for "is", "has", and "has been"? Bedankt!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maktaz

    Well, 'de jongen is een kat' is grammatically correct if you want to say 'the boy is a cat'. However, 'is' can only be used for 'hij/zij/het is' (he/she/it is) in the present time, the other versions of that verb look different.

    The full verb is 'zijn' as in 'wij zijn mannen' (we are men). The past tense of 'zijn' is 'was' and 'waren' (singular and plural respectively). The present perfect is 'geweest'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WheatsheafSK

    Last exercise I translated "Ik ben een jongen" as "I am a boy" and I was wrong. The right answer was I am a young man. This time with "Een jongen is een kind." I translated it to "the young man is a kid." and I was obviously wrong again.

    When is "een jongen" refer to a young man vs a boy?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoslynVera

    What os the difference between het and een?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rajatagrawal217

    In Dutch, there are three articles: “de”, “het” and “een”. “Een” is the indefinite article, so when in English you'd say 'a' or 'an', in Dutch you say “een”. The definite articles “de” and “het” don't have very clear rules for when you're supposed to use which; this will mostly be learning by heart and developing a feeling for it. However, there are some guidelines to help you along: -Diminutives: het. Diminutives can be recognised by their suffix; they end in -je, -tje, -etje, -pje, or -mpje. -Infinitives used as nouns – the gerund: het. When the infinitive form of a verb is used as a noun (e.g. 'the walking of the dog'), Dutch uses ‘het’ (het lopen van de hond). -Words ending in -um, -aat or -isme: het. With the exception of nouns that refer to people (e.g. de advocaat, 'the lawyer') - people are always referred to as ‘de’. -Most nouns beginning with ge-, be- and ver-: het. However, nouns which end in -ing do not follow this rule: those always use ‘de’. -Plurals: de. Whatever the singular article is, the plural is always ‘de’. -Obviously feminine or masculine nouns: de. Gender is very difficult to tell in Dutch, but obvious words like 'woman' (vrouw) and man get de. -Nouns ending in -tie, -thie, -sie, -aar, -eur, -er and -or: ‘de’


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Altruistic_Bree

    I'm so glad that it is pretty similar to German and that is sounds a little like English!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleCourter

    Is "is" in dutch pronounced like ish


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ibins8

    German native speaker with good english skills learning dutch with an english course. Yes, I am already starting to be confused. Half of the time they ask me to write in English I start writing in German before I correct myself. In German the sentence is "Ein Junge ist ein Kind" btw. So nearly the same as in Dutch.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xMerrie
    Mod
    • 38

    I had the exact same problem when I tried the German course! xD
    After a while I stopped, because I could literally not come up with the English translation. ^^


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaPosth

    Een and een is spelt the same but one is one and the other is a, how do you tell the difference?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeremy814489

    Accents when it means "one," and it's pronounced differently.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LanguageForLife1

    Two questions on pronunciation. 1: How do you say "is"? 2: Does "kind" have sort of a t sound on the end?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/languagepotato
    1. like the english word miss but without the m.

    2. yes, at the end of a word the d sound becomes t (as in the english word stop, not as in the english word top (i.e. without the extra puff of air)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pizspozseng

    When is s pronounced sh?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/languagepotato

    That's mainly dialectical differences


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guganathan

    I stated correct but the app failed me


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Landen357386

    Any one else always put kid instead of child


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tessa347010

    I hate these tupes of questions; I always get them wrong because of spelling


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelAnde4

    If you say "Jongen een" does it still mean "a boy" or do you need to say "een" before the noun?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yopigous

    I think that you'd need to have the "een" before the noun, because otherwise it doesn't make sense, or in some cases, it might mean something completely different.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeanJam

    a boy is not always a child, it can be a teenager a baby an adult and old man a corpse and, of course, a pre-teen!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelaGres

    why is "the boy is a child" wrong? Why wont it accept it? Can I get a reason?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeremy814489

    Because it should be "A boy" not "the boy."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mqstical

    Oh god... I thought "Een" was different from "een"!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoaqunAVsq

    I'm a spanish speaker, I do speak english and a few months ago I decided to learn german because of the accent similitudes from my perspective, now this... Is so funny kind of easy way...

    Learn Dutch in just 5 minutes a day. For free.