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"She has small children."

Translation:Zij heeft kleine kinderen.

4 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/egilliam128

With a question I got before, it said: I have a small plate. So, I put: Ik heb een kleine bord. But in that scenario, it needed to be "klein" but, why with this one is it "kleine" I'm not understanding completely.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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I read in the Tips & Notes (found in that lesson) that if the noun is a Het noun (needs that article), then it is will have the adjective without the e. But, kinderen is a de noun, so it needs the e.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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Kinderen is actually of neuter gender (a het noun), so that is not the correct explanation. I'll try to explain the complete rule. (For English speakers it's odd that children are considered neuter. But if they were not, then until recently the word would have been either masculine or feminine. Apparently the Germanic languages prefer considering children as sex-less to considering girls as masculine or boys as femine.)

  • klein - so-called undeclined form of the adjective
  • kleine - so-called declined form

For predicative use (... is klein) we always need the undeclined form.

For attributive use (de/een kleine ...) we almost always need the declined form:

  • We always need it in case of a definite article.
  • We always need it in case of common gender (de words).
  • We always need it in the plural.

The only exception:

  • For neutral gender (het word), singular words without a definite article, we need the undeclined form.

Here the exception does not apply because kinderen is plural.

Maybe it's easier to remember this way: The exception only applies if there is no definite article, but if there were a definite article, it would be het.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Remi1771

I'm not understanding it

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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Well, it's complicated. Maybe examples will help:

De words (common gender; in Flemish that's masculine or feminine; roughly 2/3 of all nouns have this gender):

  • De man is klein. De kleine man. Een kleine man.
  • De vrouw is klein. De kleine vrouw. Een kleine vrouw.

Het words (neuter gender; roughly 1/3 of all nouns):

  • Het kind is klein. Het kleine kind. Een klein kind. (The last sentence is the odd exception for het words without definite article or demonstrative.)

In the plural the adjective behaves in exactly the same way, only without the exception:

  • De mannen zijn klein. De kleine mannen. Kleine mannen.
  • De vrouwen zijn klein. De kleine vrouwen. Kleine vrouwen.
  • De kinderen zijn klein. De kleine kinderen. Kleine kinderen.
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lolita.Haze

I didnt know the "Tips and Notes" existed until I used the website :( they dont show the moblie app. :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andy.Linde

I know right! I wish they were available on the app too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/egilliam128

Thank you so much! That's a big help :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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You're welcome!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lucylocketje

I am sorry but that is just Dutch...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanish.waffles

In wonder if Calvin Klein was Dutch

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe
JohnWycliffe
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calvin_Klein_(fashion_designer)#Early_years

No, but Klein is a very old surname of German origin that spread throughout central Europe and beyond, so I'm sure some Dutch people have this last name. His dad was Austrian, his mom Hungarian, and they were Jewish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stewartpowles

I am trying to understand when to use for example kleine and klein. Did we use kleine in this example because we are talking about multiple children, in which case if the sentence was 'She has a small child' would the translation have been 'Zij heeft een klein kind'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BartOverst

Hey! It is 'Het kind' and 'De kinderen'. If a word has 'de', you will always use kleinE.

If a word has 'het', it will not be always 'klein'. Zij heeft een klein kind (She has a small child) Zij heeft het kleine kind geslagen (The small child has been hitten nu her)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SchonBaume
SchonBaume
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Excuse me, why "Kleine"??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe
JohnWycliffe
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1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SchonBaume
SchonBaume
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Thanks.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LolaAdriani

What the different 'hebben' and 'heeft'?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe
JohnWycliffe
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Hebben is both the infinitive and the plural form (used with they/zij, pl. you/jullie and we/wij), while heeft is used with the 3rd person singular (he/hij, she/zij and it/het) as well as the 2nd person singular formal you/u.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkWolthu1

Why not klein?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe
JohnWycliffe
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Because it's plural. Only the neuter singular indefinite form uses klein (other than the adverbial form).

1 year ago