"Demandrinkthetslechtebierniet."

Translation:The man does not drink the bad beer.

4 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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Why does niet not come directly after "drink"? Could I write it that way?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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In short: if the verb has a direct object and the object has a definite article (de or het), then "niet" is placed after the direct object instead of after the verb. If the direct object has an indefinite article, one uses "geen" instead of "niet". I think that is usually true correct me if I'm wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RymeLegis
RymeLegis
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Where does the "geen" go if it uses an indefinite article? "De man drinkt geen slechte bier"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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Yeah, that's right!

Although note that without the definite article, slechte becomes slecht.

"De man drinkt geen slecht bier." Good for him!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RymeLegis
RymeLegis
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Awesome, thank you!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cqfd2006

That's all correct!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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The position of niet indicates what is being negated. Where it is now, it negates the entire sentence. There are other options including the one you proposed (cum grano salis, as I'm a German native speaker):

"Niet de man drinkt het slechte bier" - but someone else does

"De man drinkt niet het slechte bier" - but he drinks something else instead

"De man drinkt het niet slechte bier" (may not be grammatical in Dutch) - the beer is actually not bad

"De man drinkt het slechte niet-bier" (may not be grammatical in Dutch) - it's so bad it's a non-beer

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarmFoothills

100% correct. Although these are probably not formal and only used in speech to explain yourself better.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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Dank u wel, johaquila.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/makiminami
makiminami
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I think, in this sentence, it comes at the end? http://ielanguages.com/dutch2.html#negative

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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Dank je wel for the link, Syttamore. :) I think I understand better now, and the other information included is great!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beatles-Musician
Beatles-Musician
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German mother tongue FTW this is so easy :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Larry_Hoover

Hij drink goede bier.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Ik drink goed bier. Hij drinkt het goede bier.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jennesy
jennesy
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Why do you need to say "the" bad beer instead of just bad beer? Is it referring to a specific beer? How do you know? Is it the "het"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lagiacrus

Yes, in this case, "het" means "the".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/egilliam128

i don't understand why it's "slechte" here, considering bier uses a "het" article. Could someone please explain?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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The exception (adjectives sometimes not being inflected in front of nouns) holds only for (singular) nouns that could have the article het but don't actually have a definite article. Usually that means that they have the indefinite article een, but it could also be geen (which, after all, means niet een - but note that apparently some people do inflect in that case), or in special contexts no article at all.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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The way I look at it is that if there is a definite article, it'll always have the -e ending (except in some rare special cases). If there is no definite article, when the word is a "de" word it has the -e ending. If not, it doesn't.

4 years ago
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