Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Zijn naam is Willem"

Translation:His name is William

4 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/StrapsOption
StrapsOption
  • 23
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Is this the first time a name has been used in a sentence on Duolingo?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenkvist
Lenkvist
  • 24
  • 22
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 7
  • 7

I don't think so. I remember learning that Luis has a computer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StrapsOption
StrapsOption
  • 23
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Oh, right. I've also just found out that they start giving you 'Roos' and 'Saskia' later.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenkvist
Lenkvist
  • 24
  • 22
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 7
  • 7

Nice. Maybe it's quite unique in introducing several language specific names.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lavinae
Lavinae
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 20
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2

That is what we were going for.
We're also giving you the Dutch and English versions of these names (when applicable).

Fun anecdote: these are the names of some of the team members' loved ones. We decided that that would give the course a nice personal touch, and it also serves as a tribute. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingthatcher
kingthatcher
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Dank jullie wel for adding that. It helps users get used to the country's names, which is very useful (I found it amazingly helpful when I studied croatian, my book had names like this).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iamcivilized

Just a suggestion, I get that Willem is the equivalent of William in English, but I feel like you should have to leave it as Willem in the translation since it's a name and not a word. (eg. Just because someone introduces themselves in Spanish as "Alejandro", I'm not going to refer to them as "Alexander" when I speak in English). But it IS cool too see Dutch names thrown in there!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajpthree
ajpthree
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

neat!! thanks!

have a lingot :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

It all depends on the algorithm. I had "Roos" first and then "Willem", and now I see I have "Saskia" to look forward to. For "Roos", both the Dutch name and English version of the name were accepted in the English translation per other users.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StrapsOption
StrapsOption
  • 23
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Yes, same here about the Dutch and English names. And I know what you mean, people get the questions in different orders.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Justin558363
Justin558363
  • 25
  • 22
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3

Is this construction the most common way to talk about people's names? Because I know in German, it's more common to say "Er heißt Wilhelm." (He is called William.) Spanish is the same ("Él se llama Guillermo.")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenkvist
Lenkvist
  • 24
  • 22
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 7
  • 7

That would be "Hij heet Willem".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

Which is more common to use in Dutch? That does surprise me that "He is called William" would be translated as "Hij heet Willem" which looks a lot like "Hij heeft Willem." which didn't make sense to me. Thank you for clearing that up below.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenkvist
Lenkvist
  • 24
  • 22
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 7
  • 7

No it isn't.

  • Hebben/hij heeft - to have/he has
  • Heten/hij heet - to be called/he's called
4 years ago