Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Dieren dragen geen klompen."

Translation:Animals do not wear clogs.

2
4 years ago

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Rhynn
Rhynn
  • 23
  • 18
  • 12
  • 11
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

For those who may still be confused, these are clogs:

No, we do not all walk around on these ;) They're part of the traditional clothing, which is... never really worn, haha.

199
Reply114 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DatIsDaz
DatIsDaz
  • 22
  • 16
  • 16
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

Ahah, a bit of originality on Duo ^^ Good idea to include this word in the exercices!

25
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
amuzulo
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2

I knew one Dutch girl who wears them occasionally, but yeah, it's not usual. :)

18
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuvieGirl

I'm from Holland, Michigan. We have a two week festival every year where we wear the traditional clothes and they dance in klompen!

13
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camjoy
camjoy
  • 17
  • 13
  • 9
  • 4
  • 18

Actually I saw someone wearing klompen in Schiphol Amsterdam airport less than two weeks ago. But perhaps he was a tourist.

8
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EnchantedMoose

Those can't ever have been practical, surely. Or comfortable!

7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8

Why not? In some sense they are comparable to the cheap one-piece rubber shoes that have become available recently.

For construction workers, wooden shoes offered more protection to the foot than modern steel-toed boots. They are also perfect for working on wet or thorny ground, are relatively light, and are easy to disinfect. Perhaps most importantly, they are very durable and can be made with a skillset quite different to the one needed for making leather shoes, so for many farmers they must have been cheaper.

Apparently they need some getting used to because the muscles of the feet are more active in them. But after a while they get pretty comfortable.

65
Reply84 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A
lukman.A
  • 21
  • 21
  • 17
  • 14
  • 6
  • 5

Very nice information.

If I may know, in Netherlands, how much do the "klompen" cost in average?

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8

I couldn't find any on the NL Ebay site, but on German Ebay it's hard to pay more than 20 Euros a (new) pair for the Northern German type, which is similar to the Dutch type. (The Swedish type has a leather cover, so is more expensive.)

9
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A
lukman.A
  • 21
  • 21
  • 17
  • 14
  • 6
  • 5

Thanks for the information.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8

This was actually news for me as well. I had no idea they are still so cheap.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JesseVDMaas

A friend of mine swears by these when he waters in the greenhouse, your feet will never get wet.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CrEEWO
CrEEWO
  • 22
  • 11
  • 6
  • 121

They're part of the traditional clothing in Galicia too! We call them "zocos".

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/florapasta

Thanks...i was wondering...

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kealiiballao
kealiiballao
  • 14
  • 9
  • 8
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Yep, dieren dragen geen klompen. Zij dragen reeboks.

33
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dadaduo
dadaduo
  • 12
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Niet, zij dragen Nike

9
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pergolesi

Ja, maar dit dier draagt een klomp:

31
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenBergy2

haha brings truth to the sentence XD (exept the geen)

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loveandelectro

This is the most Dutch-sounding sentence I have heard yet.

19
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuperSwipe
SuperSwipe
  • 22
  • 21
  • 16
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2

What is a clog?

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuperSwipe
SuperSwipe
  • 22
  • 21
  • 16
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2

Apperently klompen are typical dutch thick wooden shoes, with a fat heel.

26
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StrapsOption
StrapsOption
  • 23
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Dankje, that was useful, SwipeShot.

7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StrapsOption
StrapsOption
  • 23
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

I agree StrapsOption, SwipeShot was very helpful to SwipeShot.

44
Reply54 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuperSwipe
SuperSwipe
  • 22
  • 21
  • 16
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2

haha :)

8
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Whle_
Whle_
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3

I have a pair of clog slippers. Damn, I'm not a fish then.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anfyddiwr
anfyddiwr
  • 17
  • 17
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 84

I saw someone wearing traditional clogs at a festival with a Dutch band. He said they were very comfortable, but very sweaty.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PandoraVerbnigge

thank you, i loved this info

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MayaJnsson
MayaJnsson
  • 14
  • 12
  • 7
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

Klompen! Another wonderful Dutch word that sounds funny for a Swede. "Klumpen" means "the lump" in Swedish, and "klumpig" is "wooden" or "clumsy". Quite accurate for these shoes! Wonder if it can be used in similar ways in Dutch?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8

The first meaning (lump) is the same in German, and I checked that yes, in Dutch you can also say, for example, een klomp goud for a lump of gold.

I hope a native Dutch speaker will comment on the wooden meaning. It doesn't exist in German and I couldn't find it in my Dutch dictionary. Clumsy seems a straightforward derivation from the lump meaning, though.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackel98

Klomp sounds like clump, and if you have a clump in a pipe, you get a clog!

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nierls
Nierls
  • 10
  • 10
  • 3
  • 2

you can say "een klomp goud" "a clump of gold"

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rexieux
Rexieux
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4

it is a shock! cultural or not!

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ottovandulmen

I had completely no idea of what a clog is. Thank you.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce_OBrien

De Nederlandse muis in mijn pantry is dragt de klompen.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nierls
Nierls
  • 10
  • 10
  • 3
  • 2

De Nederlandse muis in mijn bijkeuken draagt (de) klompen* ;)

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/foroyskt

I've heard that mice in windmills sometimes wear clogs and are rather fond of going clip-clippety-clop on the stairs :)

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NerysGhemor

Hehe, I love how the word sounds like the clomping around you'll do wearing wooden shoes. ;-)

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TurilCronburg

So, nobody wears clogs! Unless robots do...

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Corneliusmuench

what is colgs???

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8

Apparently a misspelling for clogs. No idea where you saw that. There are two images of clogs embedded into this very page, in case that was your question. If you can't see them, read the other posts.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Corneliusmuench

thank you

0
Reply3 years ago