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  5. "As batatas são boas."

"As batatas são boas."

Translation:The potatoes are good.

May 3, 2013

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joaomd

This robot sucks at pronunciation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/celpek

No. The robot s pronunciation is easy to understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattOlkowski

It should have accepted potatos as a misspelling. I got the rest right, and clearly I know what the Portuguese saying. I shouldn't get punished for forgetting a silent "e" in the ENGLISH side....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamuelTompkins

Why does "nice" not work in the translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NobleJohn

Possibly it's just that no-one thought to add that as a valid translation.

It's equally possible that it's not a good translation. In English when we describe potatoes as 'good' it can mean one of two things: Either they are good potatoes meaning they are undamaged, of a good size or condition; Or we mean they taste or look good (or nice).

The dictionary definition of Nice is "Giving pleasure or satisfaction; pleasant or attractive". In other words nice does not always mean good. The potatoes can be in a good condition without giving pleasure or being attractive.

Some languages would instead use two different words, or as I think might be the case in Portuguese you need to specifically say they 'taste good' or 'look good' if that's what you meant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dandro777

I too wonder if bom/boa could mean nice, as in nice food?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/achester

So are bons and boas interchangeable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NobleJohn

Not exactly, they mean the same thing but one compliments male nouns, the other female.

O vinho è bom.

Os vinhos são bons.

A gatta è boa.

As gattas são boas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pfeil

Fixing minor errors:
O vinho é bom.
A gata é boa.
As gatas são boas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J4WNEE

Crap! I spaced out and mistook batatas for bananas! Grr


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edi2000

Me confundo na escrita


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jcs9399

How do i know when to use boa, boas, bom, or bons? Don't they all mean good?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeividGrassi

Boa = feminine singular / Boas = Feminine plural ---- Bom = male singular / Bons = Male plural

Qualquer dúvida, entre em contato. Bons estudos.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jcs9399

Never mind i read the post above. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JewishPolyglot

...and they are among the simplest of life's pleasures


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MakaylaGarcia

Isn't the verb "ser" permanent, shouldn't "estar" be used because it is impermanent?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattOlkowski

it's not all about permanence. The goodness of the potatoes is inherent to the potatoes, so ser makes sense. Then again, I'm coming from a more Spanish background than Portuguese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexsolheim

What is the difference between são and som?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharkbbb

And if you mean "somos", and not "som":

  • somos = nós somos = we are
  • são = eles/elas são = they are

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scutigera

"São" is also the male word for "Saint" as in São João.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharkbbb

Yes, there are three different etymologies of "são":

  1. (sane) sānus -> sano -> são
  2. (saint) sānctus -> santo -> são
  3. (they are) sunt -> son -> são

You can find more information in some dictionaries like Wiktionary


I think somebody had a different answer to alexsolheim, but it was deleted later. Probably the original question was about the difference between these two words:

  • são = "sound" as in "sane" (etymology 1 above)
  • som = "sound" as in "noise"

"Sound" is just a homonym in English - there are two different etymologies of "sound" similarly to the case of "são". Actually there are more than two: Wiktionary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scutigera

Thank you. It is confusing, but as you point out, English is the same. Slowly they are both unraveling all their mysteries. :)

These discussions help too. Appreciate your contributions. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mistervitor

Shouldn't fries also count for batatas? I know fries are batatas fritas, but many people in Brazil just call them batatas when they eat them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pfeil

But it's just a reduction, because in that specific situation, the rest is implied. We use reductions all the time, it would be a mess if Duolingo accepted all possible meanings, for all possible situations. Example?
Um suco de laranja, por favor = A jar/can/glass of orange juice, please


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mena911612

When complimenting a noun thats not gender specific how do we know whether to use bons or boas??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Actually, every noun has a specific gender. It'll be masculine or feminine.

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