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"You eat sandwiches."

Translation:Jij eet boterhammen.

4 years ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RemingtonNorris

It would have been nice to have learned that U also translates to you before this exercise.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snood1205
snood1205
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Does "U" really translate to you in english?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenkvist
Lenkvist
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Yes. It is more formal than "jij", so you use it to address senior people and strangers.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spiritfire
Spiritfire
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After ribbing my teenager about using "U" in text messages, your comment made this usage of "U" even stranger when you said it was more formal. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenkvist
Lenkvist
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I wouldn't actually capitalise it like that. Just "u" is fine.

Somebody else made the comment that U is the most informal form of you in English and it took me a while to realise what it was about. You're doing well in telling off your teenager because the habit of shortening words can have an averse effect on someone's ability to recognise whether words are real or not.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tamarind

As a linguist, I must say that while some people find it annoying, shortening words do not have any affect on a teenager's ability to recognize real words.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankenstein724
frankenstein724
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Thirded. If my sociolinguistics class (and, more relevantly in this case, a Ted talk by John Mcwhorter) has done anything, it has made me accepting of a wide variety of things that most people can't stand. :-P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/linguistkris

Seconded. :) Linguist power!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrianSilvi
BrianSilvi
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As another linguist, I agree. Sociolinguistically speaking, we need to find a balance between prescriptive grammar where we tell what is formally right, and descriptive grammar where we tell what is tolerable and what actually happens realistically.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Burento

Do you know if it is used in exactly the same situations as "Sie" vs "du" in German?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dimigoul
dimigoul
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Yes

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindzieh1

So is it "Jij eet" and "Jullie eten"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarmFoothills

Correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liorde95

How do you pronounced the "u"? just like the letter "U"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/linguistkris

This should be a front rounded vowel, similar to French u or German ü, but not quite as closed/fronted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bspingarn

I would like to know this as well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Estulo
Estulo
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oo as in "moon"

More accurately, ü

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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No, the "oo" in the English word "moon" sounds like the Dutch "oe". There is no sound in English that corresponds to the sound of the Dutch "u", if you speak French, it sounds like the French "u", otherwise the closest way to describe it when comparing it to English would be: the Dutch " u" sounds close to the English "u" in "universe", but it's a shorter sound.

Another way to describe it to English speakers would be: put your lips as if you were trying to say " oo" but say "ee" instead.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whodat.kg

Why is it wrong to translate it as 'Jij' though? I hardly ever use 'U'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gypsybird
gypsybird
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It's not wrong to translate "you" as "je/jij". If you want to be more polite, you can use "u". It never hurts to be polite. I would use "u" with anyone in a professional context (boss, waiter, police, doctor, professor, etc.), and with most people I don't know well, unless they told me I could use "je/jij". If you hardly ever use "u", you could be perceived as rude by some people. But I think tendencies are changing and more people skip the formalities and use "je/jij" right away nowadays. Still, personally, I would rather use "u" first and make someone smile than use "je/jij" right away and risk offending them. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zavanthos

Where did you teach about "U"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TaniTati
TaniTati
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Teach before! !! And then use it!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasonb1231

As upset as i was just finding out U is also Jij. We must realize this is merely a free app to help us learn a language. And in the end we should be garetful that the app itself comes around to actually teach us new things along the way.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tula.panda

It can be both - plural and singular

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marco.estr1
Marco.estr1
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i noticed the used U, je and jij to say you. i need an explanation

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
Mod
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Have a look at the previous comments.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julia_Cecchetto

Is "U" always capitalized, similar to "I" in English?

1 year ago