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  5. "Waar is mijn aanmelding?"

"Waar is mijn aanmelding?"

Translation:Where is my application?

July 17, 2014

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tjollans

Can someone clarify the meaning of 'aanmelding'? Is 'registration' (not accepted by Duo) a good translation? For that matter, is 'application' actually a good translation?

I would not equate German 'Anmeldung' with English 'application'. Implied in the word is that an 'application' can always be denied. An 'Anmeldung', however, is usually a formality that under normal circumstances will not be subjected to particular scrutiny, let alone be denied. Which meaning is 'aanmelding' closer to? Can it mean 'job application'? (Which 'Anmeldung' certainly can't)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vam1980

Indeed, sometimes an application is a formality, but not always. Applying at a university for instance: that's an "aanmelding". I'm not an expert on German, but I think "Aanmelding" and "Anmeldung" are pretty close in meaning. "Aanmelding" can not be used for a job application. That use of "application" does not translate literally in Dutch.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/momenttom

I'm Dutch and 'registration' was my translation. We use it like that. Maybe there is a minor difference, but I'm not aware of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GerryVeenendaal

I put "registration". And reported it; "My answer should be accepted." (I'm Duch)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amandabird83

Can someone explain the distinction between aanmelding and aanvraag?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneAmanda

I also want to know the difference between aanmelding and aanvraag.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nierls

aanvraag = request (vraag = question)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneAmanda

Yes, but in English they are translated the same way: "application." We are told "aanvraag" is "application," as in a visa application, and "aanmelding" is "application," as in an application to a university. How are they different?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susande

When you sign up for something, that's aanmelding (e.g. entering your name to be part of a field trip, applying to become member of a club). And when you request something from the other party that's an aanvraag this is usually a formal request (applying for a visa, request for a quotation).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneAmanda

Ah, I see. Thank you. I mean, bedankt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amandabird83

Bedankt, Susande! Deze uitleg is heel behulpzaam! :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FreekVerkerk

"Where is my registration? " What is wrong with that? It was not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carly666222

I also don't understand why registration is not accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rocteur

what does this mean ? And I don't speak German either ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nierls

"An application for/to a university." for example would be "Een aanmelding voor een universiteit."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rhhpk

So "Aanmelding" is a "false friend" for German speakers? - "Anmeldung" means "registration" in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FreekVerkerk

I think Aanmelding = registration = Anmeldung. What does google say? : https://translate.google.com/#view=home&op=translate&sl=nl&tl=en&text=Aanmelding. It agrees that aanmelding = registration. But for the german it says Aanmelding = Registrierung. https://translate.google.com/#view=home&op=translate&sl=nl&tl=de&text=Aanmelding Anmeldung = Registratie: https://translate.google.com/#view=home&op=translate&sl=de&tl=nl&text=Anmeldung Registrierung = registration https://translate.google.com/#view=home&op=translate&sl=de&tl=en&text=Registrierung Aanmelden en registreren is ook bijna hetzelfde natuurlijk. "To apply" and "to register". Maybe you first apply and then you are registered, if you pass some test.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilithTheLilith

Applicatie = application

Registratie/ Aanmelding = registration

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