"J'ai envie d'une banane."

Translation:I feel like having a banana.

May 3, 2013

114 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/annafranc3sca

Why can't you say "I feel like a banana"? "envie" translates to "feel like". In english we would say "I feel like a banana" to mean "I feel like having a banana" not that you actually think you are a banana.

July 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

"I feel like a banana" is accepted. UK English says "I fancy a banana". And yes, it is perfectly fine to say that. avoir envie de = to feel like (qqch). http://www.wordreference.com/fren/avoir%20envie%20de

The French "envie" means "crave" or "urge" so it's a perfectly normal expression in French and "I feel like a banana" or fill in any other food item ;-) is a perfectly normal expression in English.

For those who may have not heard this expression or who find it awkward, just accept it as it is. I feel like a hamburger! I feel like some ice cream!

January 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat

But you don't LOOK like a banana! Of course I say those sorts of things a lot, but, when you think about it, it sounds very weird.

September 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

Consider it an idiom. As an English speaker, you already know that it means "I am in the mood for a banana." Or, "You know what I would like right now? A banana!" Or, "I'm hungry for a banana". That is the sense of it. The English language has thousands of such idioms.

September 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/skiffie

Just dropping in here to say that as a native English speaker, I read 'I feel like a banana' as 'I AM a banana' lol. Maybe 'I feel like HAVING a banana' would be more accurate?

June 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

It's fine but not necessarily more accurate. The expression is flexible depending on what follows. I feel like...

  • (having) a banana
  • (going to) a movie
  • (taking) a shower

We don't have to fuss it too much. "I feel like a banana" (US) or "I fancy a banana" (UK) are quite natural. Just remember the back-sense of avoir envie de... (to have a craving for). In common English, it's "I feel like..." xxx.

June 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/skiffie

Yes I agree, I just think the US version (I feel like...) is not really as common. I generally would only say 'I feel like HAVING...' while I might say 'I fancy...' :)

June 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Gabrielle474586

that's how I feel as well. I kept coming across this, thinking "Duolingo is so silly. Who says this? xD This is so cute!"

August 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/jbburkholder

I think in American English it's more typically followed by a verb. "I feel like dancing"; "I feel like walking," though to be sure it CAN use a noun, it's just more awkward. I've heard it more as a participle: "I'm feeling a big breakfast after this run is over."

April 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Bella473197

It is funny but it's still perfectly accurate

October 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/frankie100828

It certainly does

November 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Bella473197

It does! ;)

October 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

"I fancy a banana" Seems about the right tone in English to me.

March 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/M.parlange

I answered "I DO fancy a banana", just to enphasize, But It seems to be wrong.

Anyway, I'd like to know weather my mistake consists on:

1- having added extra information (about my feelings'level) to the French sentence

2- the fact that my answer in French IS not correct itself as a sentence, independently from the English sentence.

Avanced thanks to anyone who answers me

November 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

I'm fairly certain it's number one, there's no special emphasis needed in this sentence.

November 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/marionmehr

How about I desire a Banane

October 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/tajger

What about "I have a need for a banana"?

May 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

It's not about needing a banana. It is a gentle inner craving for something such as a slight hunger for something or a feeling of wanting something that would be satisfied by having a banana. It could be used for just about anything, e.g., I feel like going to the beach: j'ai envie d'aller à la plage. Remember that FR "envie" means "craving" or "urge".

May 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/JeanTheFit

Except that "I have a craving for a banana" is rejected by Duo.

July 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

The whole expression "avoir envie de" is taken together to mean "to feel like" or "to fancy" or "to want". Yes, the word "envie" refers to a craving but we are not translating everything with literal, word-for-word translations Please look up "avoir envie de" in any French-English dictionary. [Edit: While Reverso is certainly not the Gold Standard of translations, I found only one example of using the word "crave" out of hundreds of sentences. "Crave" or "urge" help us understand the root meaning but the English translation is idiomatic].

July 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

It is used to explain how the meaning is derived from the French.

July 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LeVieuxSieur

Ce serait "J'ai besoin d'une banane"

December 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/leeviticus

unless you are low on potassium

June 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JorgLovoll

"Envie" is a substantive. It is difficult to use a verb to translate it with. It means something in the direction of lust, desire, need

January 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

The word you may be looking for is "craving".

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/siebolt

When you get over the fact that "envie" is not "envy" it is not so strange. And yes, people seem to say this.

May 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/angelo000

Does that mean this is more common than "Je veux une banane?"

June 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

It's not about being more common than "vouloir", it is a slightly different expression. FR "envie" means "urge" or "craving". So literally, it's like saying "I have a craving for a banana". But the more natural English expression is "feel like" (UK: "to fancy"), so "I feel like a banana" is a completely normal way to say that your body is trying to tell you to eat a banana. http://www.wordreference.com/fren/avoir%20envie%20de

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/kmeghnath

Do people actually use this phrasing?

May 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/narnialoverXXL

If they're crazy and think they are a banana, yes :P

February 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

There is nothing at all "crazy" about it. The expression (in both French and English) means that you have an inner desire/craving to either have something or do something. http://www.wordreference.com/fren/avoir%20envie%20de

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Anneduol1ngo

having read this discussion as far as this, and several other discussions now (I'm at 52 days) what I see is that some people want to be completely literal. Understand me properly here, I am not saying that some people have a bit of Asperger's as I do not really believe that is possible just as being a bit pregnant is not possible. However, in the broad spectrum of personality some have a more literal and black and white thinking tendency which one can see very clearly emphasised in some with Asperger's Syndrome. Please don't tell me that Asperger's is no longer a diagnosis. What I am trying to explain is that some will find difficulty in the kind of translation being discussed on this page and it is due to their neurophysiological make-up. It is not abnormal or wrong, just different, so extra patience is needed with the explanations. Language is dynamic and not always logical.

February 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

So true, Anne. I think some enjoy making a joke (as in saying "some people think they are a banana") and some interpret such a humorous expression as being serious (literal). So sometimes it's easy to get caught in the middle and being fired at from both sides. ;-)

February 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mmaracini

Envie translates to desire, and so I think my translation of "I desire a banana" is the same thing as "I want a banana." If you're saying that it doesn't, I think it's a distinction without a difference

August 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

FR "envie" is "urge" or "craving" or "desire". And the expression "avoir envie de" is literally "to have a craving for" (something). Consider it an idiom.

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Theoretically, this would be "I have a desire to..." or "I have a wish to...", adding in this case "...have...", but when is the last time anyone heard someone say "I have a desire to have a banana."? and even though "I have a desire to..." should equal "I desire..." - that would be a rather formal way to express it. The expression in French is not formal, so it should be translated with an equally common expression in English, such as "I feel like...." often adding "...having..." and when not added that is still what is meant. (Craving is so often used by pregnant women that it is now less used by others. A woman who is not pregnant would not want someone to think she is by using this expression.)

October 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZheKenQwe

English is my first language, I'm not pregnant, never have been, and I say "I'm craving X" all the time. Never occurred to me to be worried that people will think I'm pregnant, and certainly never have been mistaken to be pregnant by using that expression. I usually only use the word "crave" when its with respect to food though, and for other things I'd use duo's accepted expression "feel like" example "I feel like going for a walk." Since this is talking about an urge to eat a banana, I think "I'm craving a banana" should totally be accepted as well. I understand the discussion that things can't always be translated literally, but with respect to food, "I'm craving x" is actually common (at least where I'm from)(and not just common amongst pregnant women).

November 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DrMHaywood

There's a further possibility - the humorous response to 'I feel like a banana.' "Ah, but at least you don't look like one." Whether this would translate into French successfully, I can only guess, but will raise it at the next get-together of my anglo-french social group.

Slightly off-piste, but the group consists of about twelve people (French and English) who used to attend a formal language class in SW France. However, after the first year, the French members of the group suggested we could all meet informally over dejeuner in a restaurant instead of spending our money on formal tuition. This works very well!

December 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

Of course, I only brought forward the core word "envie" as "urge" or "craving" to demonstrate how it is rather different from a mere "desire" or "want" and to give learners a hook so as not to think of it as envying something. I.e., while it can also be translated as "want", it is qualitatively different. Idiomatically, English-speakers don't generally say "I have a desire for...." In English, it's "feel like" with the sense of an inner urge which can only be satisfied by the object.

October 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/punkish

Why did Duo croak at "I am feeling like having a banana" ? Was that so wrong?

January 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

The English verb "to feel" when it refers to an internal sensation (not touching something) is generally a stative verb (it expresses an internal state, not an action). In this sense, it is not normally used in a continuous/progressive voice. There are a number of other English verbs that behave this way: http://esl.about.com/od/grammarstructures/a/g_stative.htm EX: I know that man (not "I am knowing that man"). I see the bird (not "I am seeing the bird").

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/IngridSchuler

I didn't want to say "I feel like a banana" and translated it with with "I feel like eating a banana", but it was not accepted.

May 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy

There is nothing in the sentence that talks about it eating it. You are in a store and tell the clerk you want a banana. You don't say you want to eat a banana especially if you want to buy if for someone else.

June 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

Except that if you're buying it for someone else, you're not the one who is craving it, which is what "avoir envie de" is all about.

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

Hi, Ingrid. First, "I feel like eating a banana" is now accepted, but the expression "J'ai envie de" literally means "I have a craving for" (sth). So the notion of "craving a banana" is a completely normal thing when a person is listening to their body tell them, "Hey, I need some potassium down here. Go eat a banana right now!" If "I feel like a banana" seems silly to you, try substituting something else until you can get comfortable with the idea of what "avoir envie de" is really about. (UK version: "to fancy").

The reason it is different than just "want" is that you can want to have something for different reasons, but when you crave it (avoir envie de), you really need to consume it right now.

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Bapkin

Why wouldn't you want to say that you're a banana?

September 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/StarryCarly6

Why is it present tense instead of past tense? Wouldnt "i want" be "je veux"?

August 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

I understand, but "envie" is not a past participle such as is used with "avoir" to form the passé composé. This is a noun and "j ái envie de....." is a French expression that translates to the English expression "I feel like having...." or "I feel like....." which also means "I want". Literally, it might be thought of as "I have a desire to...." or "I have a wish to..." , but it is milder.

http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/passecompose.htm http://dictionnaire.reverso.net/francais-anglais/envie

October 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardDoc

While this is an idiom, I feel like people are missing the point (see what I did there?). The point of Duo exercises is to give you an understanding of how things are said in French. Sometimes it's not word for word, but if you've come this far in the course (and in life), I feel like you should be able to understand a metaphor (oops, I did it again).

It's nearly lunchtime. I feel like (I want to eat) a banana (to remove my hunger).

October 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/saucysalmon55

Could "I have a hankering for..." be accepted? It was the only word I could think of at the time!

July 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

Only if you live in certain rural areas of the Old West. ;-)

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/GrahamNdP

This expression is also known in South Africa (although not commonly used)!

August 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/jc0204

This is probably the most awkward sentence translation I have ever stumbled upon in DL!

August 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

Whenever you come across something that is unfamiliar to you, it may indeed seem awkward. But in this case, it is a very common expression in English to say "I feel like" + fill in your favorite food item here. So embrace the awkwardness for now but know that it is not at all awkward to millions of English speakers. The Brits say "I fancy a banana". It's the same thing.

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/bolletjeb

It may be common in YOUR language, but as a non-native speaker I am not interested in American English idioms when learning French. So please Duolingo, either skip this sentence or give us a proper translation.

December 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/faerthen

Take it easy. I would call this the proper translation. It would actually feel a bit stilted to say anything other than, "I feel like a banana". But if you just can't accept that, then next best would probably be, "I feel like eating/having a banana".

Of course, there are lots of other ways to convey this sentiment: "I'm dying for a banana", for instance.

December 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/bolletjeb

As I mentioned above, "I would love a banana" would easily solve the problem!

January 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

But there is no "problem". There is only unfamiliarity with this very common English expression (to feel like/to fancy) which is the counterpart to the French expression (avoir envie de). http://www.wordreference.com/fren/avoir%20envie%20de

June 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

But this most certainly is a proper translation. This course is French for English-speakers. If you are not familiar with English expressions and idioms (whether UK or US versions), you are going to have a tough time.

December 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/bolletjeb

Well, then why not translate this into proper English: I fancy a banana. - 'I feel like a banana' sounds to me as someone who is feeling rather awful. I'd love a banana, though. (In fact this is what the French sentence expresses.)

January 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurenDuffield

Saying "I feel like a banana" is one of the best ways of telling someone you would like to eat a banana, as it leaves room for the reply of "Well, you don't LOOK like a banana"... something I use all the time when my boyfriend says "I feel like a..." much to his disdain, hehehe.

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

Different strokes for different folks. UK EN uses "fancy". Others use "feel like". One is not more "proper" than the other. What the French sentence expresses is a craving for something, either to have something or to do something. It would not be translated as "I'd love a banana". http://www.wordreference.com/fren/avoir%20envie%20de

January 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/colby44444

As a teenager in the US I can tell you that very few young people say I feel like + food item. People pretty much always just say "I want a banana" or "a banana sounds good" I guess something like "I feel like a banana" would be something older generations would say.

April 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

"I want a banana" is also accepted. Duolingo tries to use expressions that are considered relatively standard or at least standard colloquial. This determination is not made by voting, but by references that show what people in general say. They may differ as to dialect (UK/US) and degree of formality (polite/standard/colloquial). That is why dictionaries play an important part in learning a new language. To demonstrate this, please open this link in a browser: http://www.wordreference.com/fren/avoir%20envie%20de

April 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sola828685

I feel like a dummy (silly/idiot) just an expression...non?

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

No, we're not talking about a metaphor for a banana.

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/GrahamNdP

One might say, "I feel like [such] a banana! I shouldn't have said that!" to express feeling like an idiot. What would be the best way to say that phrase in French?

August 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/manolia5

How come I wrote "i want a banana" but turned out to be correct, also gave me another translation"i feel like a banana" It kind of confused me, J'ai <- So it's like i have, J'ai envie <- I have a feeling "I have a feeling of a banana." <- Complete translation

Still I can't wrap my mind about why did i think of "i want a banana" and it said correct?

And yes. I sometimes have the feeling of a banana. seriously, duolingo?

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

You can't necessarily translate word for word. It's probably best to take "j'ai envie de ..." as an entire phrase and translate it as "I want ..."

And "I feel like a banana" does not mean that your feeling is the same as a banana's feeling - it's an English idiom for "I would like to eat a banana now".

October 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/manolia5

oh i see! that kind of make sense. I'm not an English native speaker, so I only know it in form of "feel like having" . Thanks for making it clear!

October 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

"I feel like having a banana." is also accepted as correct and "I feel like a banana." is actually just a shorter form of the same thing. Over time, people sometimes cut a word and eventually the shorter version actually became so common that everyone understands it. Some people still make jokes about that expression though.

October 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/peterschei2

I agree with you 100%, allintolearning. Altho I love DL, some of its participants are far too rigid, and do recognize (or respect) the flexibility and evolving nature of language. I also understand that DL is limited by their program in the scope of their 'acceptable answers.

October 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/manolia5

ooh got it!:D kind of common in turkish as well. it's prone to joke lol

October 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

It is not "have a feeling of a banana". "Avoir envie de" translates (literally) to "have a craving for" (something). The comparable English idiom is "to feel like" (US) or "to fancy" (UK). It can be followed by a noun or a verb. J'ai envie de me promener = I feel like taking a walk. http://www.wordreference.com/fren/avoir%20envie%20de

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LisaJK67

Why would you say I feel like vs I wish, "Je souhaite un banana? Is one more appropriate than the other?

November 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

The expression "I feel like (something)" is used to indicate an urge for something, not a wish or even a desire for it. It is a subtlety captured by the two idioms ("avoir envie de" and "to feel like"). Did you ever have a craving for some kind of food? That is the meaning of "avoir envie de".

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/VaclavKlic

"I feel like Chinese food." "I feel like a cup of coffee." These are somehow fine. But in "I feel like a banana." there is such a strong double meaning, that it made me look up "avoir envie de" in the dictionary, just to check if I was not missing something. You can feel like two cents, so hey, maybe you can feel like a banana. Probably not a nice feeling though. (It would be definitely more professional to avoid any double meaning in a language learning course...)

March 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

But there is no double meaning. The challenge is to grasp "avoir envie de" to mean that you feel like having (eating) or doing something. UK speakers may say "fancy". http://www.wordreference.com/fren/avoir%20envie%20de A native English speaker would not bat an eye if you said "I feel like a banana" and would definitely know what you wanted....followed by offering you a banana.

June 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JeanTheFit

"I wish I had a banana" should be accepted. I get annoyed when people argue about the subtleties of the ENGLISH language in this FRENCH language course. I think if someone translates "avoir envie" to "to wish," we can have a high degree of confidence that he or she can translate the expression in both directions with the proper meaning, subtle or otherwise.

May 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

There is no "wish" (souhaiter). "Avoir envie de" is literally "to have a craving for" something. The standard interpretation is "to feel like" (US) or "to fancy" (UK). There is no reason to make it into a "wish" when that only demonstrates a confusion with souhaiter. http://www.wordreference.com/fren/avoir%20envie%20de

June 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JeanTheFit

Banaana banahna.

I think you and I have very different ideas about what constitutes "accurate" translation. For example, I would worry more about confusion over the phrase "feel like" than over the word "souhaiter." And I think I would be FAR more inclusive than you would be where it comes to English reflecting the sense of the French, especially where it comes to a squishy word like "envie" and a comical expression like "feel like."

June 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

First, native English speakers do not change their speech patterns based on what is said in another language. Second, "envie" (craving/lust) is used in the expression is not taken literally but interpreted from the phrase "avoir envie de". By definition, the meaning of the expression is not just a literal translation. Third, there is nothing at all squishy about "envie" nor comical about "feel like". Is it necessary to sidestep all the dictionary definitions for "avoir envie de" as "feel like" (US) or "fancy" (UK) because you would rather translate it literally? [Edit: Duo's "preferences" are supported by dictionary definitions, not feelings, and it is important to remember that some expressions that seem natural to US English speakers may seem odd to British speakers and vice-versa].

June 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Eluzie

Thank you for once again raising the bar. Have a king of.

June 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Eluzie

Oops, it's supposed to read 'lingot'

June 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JeanTheFit

It seems to me that Duo is (via you) insisting on "personal preference," whereas I'm just asking, as I have done a number of times, for a bit less fussiness.

Or, if you prefer, continue this pedantic argument alone. I'm done with it.

June 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/spid3rsman

I was so confused until I read the comments ;'D this sentence is gold though!

August 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Trofaste

OK, a slightly silly question, is this how you would say "I feel like a banana" literally? Or does that have a different translation, like "Je me sens d'une banane"?

October 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/RoiZhu

Stupid me: I typed "I am jealous of a banana."

November 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/leeviticus

wow... sorry, bro. just remember, it's not the size of the boat, it's also the motion of the ocean

July 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SimonMcCar

You look like one too.

November 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ZheKenQwe

Why isn't "I'm craving a banana" accepted? I'm a native English speaker, I get food cravings all the time, and I would totally say, for example, "I'm craving pizza," or "I have a craving for bacon."

November 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Wonderboy6

is the use of 'a envie de' trnalsate closer as a 'strong desire for' rather than simply ' i want'?

December 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

It is a craving or desire. See my comment above.

January 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JorgLovoll

The past participle is used. J'ai envie d'une banane. Shouldn't that translate into "I wanted a banana"

December 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

No past participle in this sentence.

"ai" = have, as a full verb in the meaning of "possess", not a helping verb used to form the compound past tense (passé composé).

"envie" is a noun here meaning something like "desire".

December 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JorgLovoll

I think we have had the sentence in an earlier lesson in the present tense form Je envie une banane. Is that a less common expression for the same?

December 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
  • 1716

No, there is no sentence for "J'envie une banane". The expression is "avoir envie de". http://www.wordreference.com/fren/avoir%20envie%20de

June 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Whatthelumps

just out of interest, if you actually wanted to say you felt alike to something (using banana as an example cos I can't think of anything else) maybe it would be something like 'Je me sens comme une banana'. That really doesn't sound right but it is the best I can think of. Maybe 'Je pense que je suis comme une banane' which sounds too long and doesn't really get the gist of 'feeling' as if you are something. Ugh

July 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jurrburr

Pourquoi est-ce que《I desire a banana》est incorrect ?

November 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Bibliana1

This sentence makes me chuckle every time it comes up. I keep reading it as 'I like I am a banana', rather than what it surely must be, 'I would like to have a banana'. Perhaps I have worked with children too much, where it is entirely possible that they could mean either thing. Especially around Hallowe'en, when they might be discussing costumes!

November 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Beople

Yes, we all feel like a banana!

February 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Zahra_cx

Finally someone understands how I feel. I always thought I alone felt like a banana. Thanks Duo for making me feel at home :)

May 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/IanWitham1

"I want a banana" was accepted. Duo is teaching us to translate Arthur Askey's songs.

July 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ufpc
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Finally I know how to say I feel like a banana in French! This should have been introduced in the first lesson!

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

that is a bad day.

September 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Bapkin

Je suis une banane!

September 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KimSCasey

Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don't....... (Americans will get this reference.) Almond Joy./Mounds

October 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrDemetr

I have heard of "I feel for a..", which is common in the UK. But I think the 'grammatarians such as Neville Gwynne, would wince.

November 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/gunce1

I feel like a banana can translate in French to 'Je me sens comme une banane' lol I feel like knowing French.;)

December 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaIramendy

Could you say I feel like eating a banana. To have a banana lives you thinking what she or he is going to do with it.

March 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/amharris1962

"I want a banana" seems more natural to me.

June 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/effyleven

I just "felt like a banana" for the sake of this exercise.. and felt no sense of irony at all. Good! The therapy must be working.

September 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Bella473197

I love how one of the correct solutions is "I feel like a banana." I know what it means but it just sounds funny ;)

October 12, 2018
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