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"Het spijt me."

Translation:I am sorry.

0
4 years ago

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Anhonime
Anhonime
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more literally "I regret it" (but with places of the subject and the object switched)

68
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillofKempsey
BillofKempsey
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It grieves me? Antiquated English for sure but still used.

66
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristopherEster

This was my first reaction too

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IrennaNicole
IrennaNicole
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i wrote "i regret it" but it's incorrect. They say "i regret it" should be "ik heb er spijt van."

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ddaku

"forgive me" works too, and makes a lot more sense to my brain than "I am sorry"

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Forgive me = vergeef me

10
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nnikolov30
nnikolov30
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I can swear that the lady says "het spijts me".

14
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrgoCroatia
GrgoCroatia
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He spits on me :D that's what I first heard!

16
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cris_Grey
Cris_Grey
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I agree, it should accept also `It grieves me' and 'I regret it'

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/costyn
costyn
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Nobody says 'it grieves me' in English do they? I regret it should be accepted yes

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TwoWholeWorms
TwoWholeWorms
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I don't think "I regret it" should be accepted, since that would be "Ik betreur het," and that has a different implication. Not that you'll ever hear anyone north of Antwerp say either sentence. o.o

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RMeereboer

I must agree... my father is from Holland and he rarely apologizes or regrets anything verbally.

13
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeighHowes

You're comment helped me out as I was wondering if this sentence could alos mean "I regret it", but now I'm confused. Are there regional differences with how dutch is spoken in different parts of the netherlands?

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sadietje
Sadietje
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Im living in belgium, and everywhere is so different, even like 20km away its different.

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raahiba
Raahiba
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Absolutely. It's a small country with great linguistic differences. Then you've got the varieties spoken in Belgium on top of the varieties within the Netherlands. It's fascinating :)

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlaackRock
BlaackRock
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I suppose its like the english spoken in America or England or the islands. Its still english but sometime the words and phrasescan mean sometime difference

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillofKempsey
BillofKempsey
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It is rarely used these days but it gives an apparently equivalent meaning of "spijt"

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jason782292

It is used in the Jamaican dialect

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrikrishna1
shrikrishna1
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I agree, but who will accept it=

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TwoWholeWorms
TwoWholeWorms
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"It grieves me" isn't really a valid sentence, though. "It spites me" however really ought to be accepted, but with the caveat of popping up a message that says "Yes, it does mean this, but it actually maps to "I am sorry"."

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mycroft
mycroft
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"It grieves me" certainly is a valid sentence, or at least sentence fragment ("it grieves me to report that …", e.g.), but probably doesn't really fit here. "It spites me" is a very unlikely sentence, but would imply the speaker is the one taking offense, not the listener (i.e., it could mean something more like "you should be sorry" than "I'm sorry"), therefore shouldn't be accepted.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jack_waugh
jack_waugh
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The grammatical construction of this sentence nearly parallels the expression having the same meaning in German. Es tut mir leid. At least, both use the objective case for the first-person pronoun, and both use "it".

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OganCihan
OganCihanPlus
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Can we think of it like "Tut mir leid" in German, that literally means "It makes me sad" but used as "Sorry"?

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeoTubNinja
NeoTubNinja
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Seems so. Literally translated it sounds weird, but the meaning is the same.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BilboBaggins0135

It spites me.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/costyn
costyn
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That's interesting, although the translation of the 2 words spite and spijt is not one-to-one I'm sure historically one of the words is borrowed from the other language (not sure which way). I'd have to look it up, but I'm not a linguist, no idea where to start.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillofKempsey
BillofKempsey
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I think both languages will have got it from a common ancestor, possibly Frisian. The meanings have drifted apart. Whereas spite means to do or intend somebody harm, spijt seems to mean upset or distress somebody. Not all that far apart, really.

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillofKempsey
BillofKempsey
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We don't actually say that, in England at least.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jack_waugh
jack_waugh
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Nor in the US of A.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LusySmith

i think it should accept Excuse me.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Machteld3199

No, because 'excuse me' is not the same as 'I'm sorry'

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdeebNqo

when does "het" not mean "the"/"it", is this a special case?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillofKempsey
BillofKempsey
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No. It means "it" here. See Cris_Grey's comment above.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdeebNqo

so the literal translation would be "it regrets me"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillofKempsey
BillofKempsey
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More "It is-regretted-by me". The nearest English literal translation seems to me to be "it grieves me".

11
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusty_G
Dusty_G
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is it okay for me to say "spijt me" instead of "sorrie"

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snowflakepop

Is there a difference between het spijt me and het spijt mij?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bentemarijn

No, you can use both. Het spijt me is, however, used more, especially when talking out loud.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sawhneyraghav

can we say the above discussed phrase as 'Ik ben spijt' or 'Ik spijt het'?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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No, to give some English equivalents the first would be like saying I am regret and the second like saying I sorry it

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/muto14

What is the different with "pardon me" thank you

1
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaxBerre

me and mij, je and jij, are supposed to be interchangeable. It isn't correct to say that one is correct while the other is wrong.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarmFoothills

The idiom is "Het spijt me". "Het spijt mij" is very rare.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bentemarijn

I agree that it is rare, but it is not incorrect. Yes, you will sound weird if you say 'het spijt mij', but it is technically not wrong.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Machteld3199

You can say 'het spijt mij', but you would only use 'mij' if you're trying to emphasise that YOU're the one that's sorry.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/12LaurenJ

Het spijt mij? why is that wrong???

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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It's not wrong, only if it is a listening exercise you have to write what is being said which in this case is me.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RileyR24

Is spijt pronounced with long a sound or sp eh t

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raahiba
Raahiba
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Neither. It's a diphthong with no English equivalent. If you listen to this phrase and others with the same sound in it'll help you to get the hang of it.

0
Reply2 years ago