"Hebbenjulliejurkenenjassen?"

Translation:Do you have dresses and coats?

4 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/StrapsOption
StrapsOption
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Five times fast.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loveandelectro

Is jas strictly a suitcoat, or is it used for any coat, like a winter coat? Also, I think "have you..." should be an acceptable construction for these types of translations, so I reported it. Although I rarely hear it in American English, I like to translate "hebben jullie..." to "have you..." or "have you all..." because it helps me to think in Dutch, so to speak.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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A JAS is used for any coat. We have of course several kinds of coats, to distuinguish between them something is added. Examples. trainingsjas, regenjas, winterjas, zeiljas and for the smaller coats for the kids: regenjasje, winterjasje. etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hyacinth3704

The speaker - even when slowed - sounds like 'he' is pronouncing jassen with almost a zh [ʒ] sound rather than a "yuh" [j] sound. Is that just an artifact of the speech synthesis, or would that actually happen as the words get rolled together in natural speech?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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For me it doesn't sound like that, but even if it did, I think it could well be in the normal range of Dutch pronunciation. What you are expecting is basically the only normal pronunciation of j in German. But Dutch is more similar to English than German is, and it has a stronger French influence than German does, so i would expect a tendency towards [ʒ].

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hyacinth3704

Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Randy579349

Can you also say, have you any, instead of, do you have any?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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As in "Baa baa black sheep, have you any wool?" For some native speakers of English the answer is still yes (as it was for Shakespeare), for some it is already no. Of course this has nothing to do with Dutch. See my long comment for more details.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hamsa864697

Do you start with the word hebben when you're asking a question.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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In this case yes. Questions, like other sentences, typically start with what is most important. In a question that has a question word ("wh..."), that's the question word. In a yes/no question (such as this one), that's the verb. Just like in English, except in English the first word in a yes/no question is typically do.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RadoslawNo1

So if jurken and jassen were singular, would you have to put an article in front of them?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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Yes. In this respect (as in so many), Dutch works exactly like English:

  • Hebben jullien een jurk en een jas? - Do you have a dress and a coat?
10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DJFalconX

Do is not in the question in dutch please fix

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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The construction with do is called "do support". It is required in questions for full verbs in Celtic, English and very few other languages. In other Germanic languages such as Dutch and German, do support can often be used colloquially or in dialects, but it is considered wrong in the standard language.

English speakers disagree with each other about whether do support is required when have is used as a full verb. This is because do support once wasn't required at all (and in fact was wrong!), and is still wrong for auxiliaries. Since have can also serve as an auxiliary, use of have as a full verb is one of the last cases of full verbs not requiring do support -- for some but not all speakers.

For some English speakers, "Have you dresses and coats?" is still grammatical. Others consider it wrong and insist on saying "Do you have dresses and coats?" (treating have as a full verb) or "Have you got dresses and coats? (avoiding the issue).

So long as the other two variants are also accepted, there is nothing to fix.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ned61
Ned61
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You are absolutely correct!

3 years ago
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