"A woman eats the apple."

Translation:Een vrouw eet de appel.

4 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ntroutman

Whats with "appletje"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ayoub920076

When we add "je" or "tje" at the end of a word, it makes it a diminutive. So, in this case, "appeltje" means " a little apple". And with this kind of words, the determiner is always "het". I hope that my explanation is clear and useful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimHeded

Dimunitiv. Little apple

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrancisKon

So "eet" is an irregular verb because the form "Ik" and "Zij" use the same spelling, right?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarmFoothills

Not exactly. They are the same because eet in ik eet already ends with a t.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcvdKorput
MarcvdKorput
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Eten (to eat) is indeed one of many irregular verbs in Dutch (welcome to Dutch, a language with more exceptions than rules :P (I'm a native speaker)). However, the irregularity is only relevant in the past tense; some additional information can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Past_tense#Dutch.

WarmFoothills is right about why 'ik' and 'hij/zij/ze' are the same. When writing a verb, you first take the stem (remove the 'en' at the end of the verb and than add:

ik (first person singular): [nothing]

jij/u (second person singular): -t (most of the time, there is one exception)

hij/zij (third person singular): -t

all plural forms: -en (yielding the infinitive)

So, for 'eten', you remove 'en' at the end, so the stem becomes 'et-'; then adding [nothing] or a 't' both result in 'et' and adding 'en' yields 'eten'. This however yields a change of the sound of the word in the singular (not in the plural).

Because the sound of the first 'e' changes, an additional 'e' is needed, so 'et' becomes 'eet'. To elaborate: both the first 'e' in eten and 'ee' in 'eet' are pronounced somewhat like the 'a' in 'late'; 'et' is pronounced like 'wet' without the 'w'. (Perhaps someone with knowledge about IPA could elaborate on this.)

Sorry about the long post, I got a bit carried away :).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moonious

Random question since you are a native Dutch speaker, have you heard of Within Temptation? They inspired me to learn Dutch :). Love the language!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babushka5

It's good to know that Dutch cares whether the look and sound of words match. English struggles with that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sam_rods10

When can I use "het" and "de" what is the difference?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcvdKorput
MarcvdKorput
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'De' and 'het' are the definite articles in Dutch, equal to 'the' in English.

Dutchs nouns have three genders: masculine, feminine and neuter.

'De' is used for masculine and femine nouns in the singular. 'Het' is used for neuter nouns in the singular.

Furthermore, 'de' is used for all plural nouns.

There are some rules (although they are mere guidelines because of the exceptions everywhere in Dutch :P), but you'll have to learn the gender by heart. Some information on these rules can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender_in_Dutch_grammar and here: https://onzetaal.nl/taaladvies/advies/de-het-algemene-regels The last one links to the site of the society dedicated to the Dutch language. It is in Dutch, but it is very useful for some background information.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snootella
snootella
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wouldn't it be "eett"? since this is third person?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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No, if a word ends on a -t it does not get an extra -t when conjugated.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snootella
snootella
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Does it get an extra one otherwise?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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I most cases, for example komen (to come) is a regular verb.

  • Ik kom
  • Jij komt
  • Hij komt
  • Wij komen
  • Jullie komen
  • Zij komen

Another example of a word of which the stem ends on a -t is zitten (to sit), so you don't get an extra -t.

  • Ik zit
  • Jij zit
  • Hij zit
  • Wij zitten
  • Jullie zitten
  • Zij zitten
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snootella
snootella
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Danke!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AadhithyaR

Why is it "Het sap" but "de appel"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/filopoz

Why should I use de instead of het?

1 year ago
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