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  5. "Welterusten"

"Welterusten"

Translation:Good night

July 18, 2014

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fireman_biff

Is this used to say hello at night, to say goodbye at night, or when going to bed?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xiaqqaix

Literally it means "rest well". So it must be used before going to bed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gio_Iaco

Etymology FTW! Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Geoffrey878583

Bedankt. I needed that explanation in order to remember it. "rusten" is "to rest", correct? And "te" seems to imply some reverse motion (I infer from other verbs using "te"). Am I on the right track?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fiyalka2

The "te" is your "to", just with a different word order. It is literally "(Wish you) well to rest!" = Wish you to rest well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulineStinson

CheerXiao is right. You say welterusten only if someone is going to bed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/potatoeglot

So it's kinda like "oyasuminasai" in Japanese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mathso2

I'm pretty sure - as opposed to konbanwa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrancisKon

So when should we use "Goedenacht" as opposed to "Welterusten" and vice versa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susande

You can use both, another one you can use is slaap lekker, the only case when I wouldn't use goedenacht is when someone goes to sleep in the morning or afternoon e.g. a kid's afternoon nap. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Razbojnica

i also said 'slaap wel' often in Netherlands - was that okayish? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susande

Yes, that's a common one as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Petrie1990

Would one use slaap lekker in general? Because in Afrikaans it's lekker slaap, but what I've heard is that you only use the term lekker in Dutch for something edible?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susande

You can use it, sure. Lekker is more broad than what you've heard. Indeed it's used for edible things, but it can basically be used for everything enjoyable or comfortable, e.g. someone attractive (lekker ding), nice weather (lekker weer), I'm sitting comfortably (ik zit lekker). And also sleep well (slaap lekker).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Petrie1990

Than you appreciate it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TudorPaun1

Dutch speaker here. Lekker is for lots of good things, not just tasty. Slaap lekker and welterusten can be used interchangeably


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fiyalka2

May be you heard that from German? The German "lecker" is only used for "yummy, tasty", so the Dutch "lekker" is really cute to German speakers, it is like wishing someone a yummie sleep or saying the weather is yummie. :o) Thus, "lekker" is one of my favourite words in Dutch! :o)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeoTubNinja

Sounds like the second E isn't being pronounced. Is it supposed to be silent?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulineStinson

Many people say weltrusten, indeed. But in written language, the e can't be left out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandomCesar

So, is it just a way to say it or is it a rule?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulineStinson

It's not a rule; some people do pronounce the second "e". So choose whatever you find easiest or best.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandomCesar

Very informative. Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alberto.m.11

I have never heard it when someone leaves the office . it is allways goedenavond


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/34Dell17

Probably because they aren't going to bed. Same with 'good night' (not evening) in some respects.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katelyn2727

How is Welterusten pronounced?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndySilva196517

I live with a Dutch family and they always say Trusten before go to bed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fiyalka2

That is the same shortening that happens with "Goedendag" to "Dag":
Wish you to have a good day! -> Good day! -> Day!
Wish you to rest well! -> To rest well! -> T-rest!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talat

Is it it any way connected to the english word roost ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulineStinson

no, it's connected to the English word "rest"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Common-Wealth

They come from different words etymologically. Roost comes from a word thats originally associated wth "roof" and later with birds/hens.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quadrin

I've noticed that the "h"'s in these sentences always sound like "v"'s. I can't differentiate the two at times, and it kinda bugs me. Anybody notice a difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulineStinson

I finally realized why a Dutch "w" sounds like a "v" to some listeners. Our "w" sounds like a German "w", but not like an English "v"; we already have a "v" for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susande

There are no h's or v's in welterusten.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quadrin

Woops. I meant W. xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OttoArchimedes

They are almost the same to english speakers but dutch people here it when you ask them what it is


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/languagepotato

In northern and western accents, such as mine, w is pronounced exactly like english 'v' whereas 'v' is pronounced like 'f'. So in these accents, instead of almost no difference between 'v' and 'w', we have no difference between 'v' and 'f' in our pronunciation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinSvolle

velltyften... that's what I hear. Does anyone know of an awesome link to pronunciation explanations on the net?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke2307

Could be like English ‘well to rest’


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/visculamia

I feel like translating welterusten with good night is wrong, not to mention confusing.. Welterusten means sleep well, regardless of the moment of day. So I could say welterusten to a child who goes for their afternoon nap for instance. Similarly I can say good night (goede nacht) when I leave late at night to someone who isn't going to sleep (they might have a night shift for instance)...

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