https://www.duolingo.com/Zimni

Difficulty level just shot up in the Verbs Past section! Tips?

Anybody else experienced it too? I thought I was gliding over the Spanish tree, only to be faced with the -ar, -er and -ir verb classifications. Feels like I have to re-learn the complete sentence construction bit too. My main problem is how to know which verb belongs to which category, and then to remember all forms of conjugation for it. The tree so far did not prepare me for this. Probably would have helped to learn about verbs keeping -ar, -er and -ir forms and then taking it into present and past. Any tips to get past this block, or does it become easier with practice? Thanks a lot!

4 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/OnesimusUnbound

You can start learning the conjugation rules at this site.

http://studyspanish.com/tutorial.htm

To practice, I go to this site to drill through different verb conjugations.

http://www.spaleon.com/

Finally, aside from these conjugation rules, you have to take into consideration the irregular conjugation forms of a verb.

Mejores deseos :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zimni

Thank you! This looks like it will take a huge amount of practise to master, but am game for it. Thanks so much for these links.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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Spanish actually has two past tenses. There is imperfect, or imperfecto, for events that were ongoing over time. There is preterit, or pretérito, which is for events at a specific time in the past that occurred and ended. You frequently see them both in the same sentences, when the imperfect sets the stage for a preterit event: Cuando estudiaba español, aprendí muchas cosas. When I used to study Spanish, I learned a lot of things.

Spanishdict.com has excellent grammar study sheets with self test quizzes at the end. Here are a few of them:
Imperfect Tense Forms
Preterit Tense Forms
Preterit vs. Imperfect

There are others on irregular verbs but the above will cover the basics.

SpanishDict also has videos on YouTube. Lessons 2.6 through 2.10 in this playlist will be of interest to you.

Here are study sheets about the present tense -ar, -er, and -ir verbs:
Present Tense Forms

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zimni

Oh my! Looks like a lot of practise hours ahead of me. However, am determined to get past this and thank you so much for the references. I know I will be needing them.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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Yup. Slow and steady wins the race. Although I do make a strong effort to keep my streak alive and do some Duo every day, I find that sometimes I need to focus a bit outside of Duo to pick up skills. So my apparent (Duo) progress slows, but my real (brain) progress keeps plugging along.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FenniB
FenniB
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Yes, I definitely experienced a "break" in the verbs past section as well. It was a little demotivating, but I've decided to just go on. So far, it has worked alright, but of course I'm nowhere near perfect in verb conjugation at all.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zimni

I too am recovering from that demotivated streak, and I guess its the want of learning this beautiful language that will keep us going :) Practice, practice and more practice days lie ahead! Good luck to us!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobbieL
BobbieL
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I pretty much always slow to a crawl when I hit a big batch of verb lessons. I actually think I probably spent weeks sitting at Verbs Past and not even trying to push forward anymore, because it was starting to get frustrating and I had a big certification exam coming up (in a completely unrelated field) and I decided I needed to back off and make things easier on myself.

I personally feel that using Memrise to practice vocabulary and verb forms helps me tremendously. It seems to me that if I try to actually keep attempting Duolingo exercises long enough to develop a feel for individual words on a lesson like that, I'm more likely to just end up memorizing the actual sentences Duolingo is giving me without understanding very much about what the individual words are contributing to it.

It'll definitely get easier with practice. I don't think my case is a great example of what to do, since most people won't enjoy the strategy of "get stuck for a couple of months, and then finally push yourself through it". At least the upside of being stuck is that you get a lot of time in practicing the stuff that came before verb past, so you're less likely to trip over the remainder of the sentence other than the verbs.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zimni

Hey BobbieL, Thanks and while it may not be the fastest way to learn, the 'got stuck for long, lost-my-streak, gave self some time off, came back determined' happened with me too. After posting this discussion two days ago, I am so happy to share that I finished the ten lessons of Verbs Past set! Yes, I may not have conquered it fluently, but I did my best, took notes, practiced extra, and shall keep at it.

I feel Duolingo has this amazing design quality that one discovers as one plays along - it may look difficult at the onset, but if you keep going through the lessons, you build an understanding of what they are trying to teach - without it being all lesson-ey. That's what I learnt through this phase. Though that part where you say you end up memorising the sentences is quite true too. Has happened to me. Then again, I tell myself, getting comfortable with the phrases is also needed. I take a lot of notes during lessons to go back to - maybe that could help?

Thanks for the Memrise reference. I know I will now be needing practice outside Duo too.

4 years ago
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