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"I will give you this book."

Translation:Ik zal jou dit boek geven.

4 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Objectivist
Objectivist
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These translations are tricky. The English word 'will' doesn't always denote that something will happen in the future. Sometimes the word signifies that something is unavoidable (i.e. a law of nature for example).

"Hot air will rise" for example, should be translated with "Hete lucht stijgt" and not "Hete lucht zal stijgen". In the same vein, I think the translations "Ik zal jou dit boek geven" and "Ik geef jou dit boek" are both correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenkvist
Lenkvist
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Thank you for your explanation. It is true that you can sometimes use the Present in places where you would use a future form in English. I am just a bit confused about your example of "Hot air will rise".

"Hete lucht stijgt omhoog" is a contamination. "Stijgen" already means that something goes upwards so you'd either have to say "hete lucht gaat omhoog", "hete lucht stijgt" or "hete lucht stijgt op" (from the verb opstijgen).

These sentences can indeed be used to describe a law of nature, but theoretically you could construct a sentence like "Hot air will rise tomorrow" and then it would be fine to say "Morgen zal hete lucht opstijgen".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Objectivist
Objectivist
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You're right, it was an example that I thought up in the spur of the moment so I didn't notice the tautology/contamination. Disregard the word 'omhoog'.

Your example is of course correct. The translation of "Hot air will rise tomorrow" emphasizes when it happens (e.g. 'morgen', in the future) and then the word 'zal' is of course correct, even though you could also say: "Morgen stijgt hete lucht op".

What I was trying to say is that 'will' doesn't always denote a future tense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcfitjar

Why is "deze boek" not correct? What's the difference between dit and deze?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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  • Het boek - Dit boek
  • De hond - Deze hond

Same applies for that book etc.

  • Het boek - Dat boek
  • De hond - Die hond
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcfitjar

Ah, of course! Thanks a lot :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wavva
wavva
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Why is it "jou" and not "je / jij"?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WouterVerhelst

Because 'jou' is used for the object of the sentence.

If you can replace 'you' in the English sentence with 'to you' without changing the meaning much, then Dutch wants 'jou':

I will give you this book/I will give this book to you -> ik zal jou dit boek geven/ik zal dit boek aan jou geven.

The 'to you'/'aan jou' forms are grammatically slightly different, but the two sentences have mostly the same meaning.

5 months ago