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  5. "Usted llamaba a Europa."

"Usted llamaba a Europa."

Translation:You used to call Europe.

May 4, 2013

66 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/craig.zar210

you used to call europe? what, after getting off the phone with antarctica?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom873317

If your company has an office in Europe, you might refer to the office as just Europe. It's probabaly a more common construction with city names: "I just got off the phone with Cleveland. They're fresh out of staplers."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulianBixler

What company is so big that it's transcontinental, but only has 1 office in the entirety of europe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tony_Isaac

I have worked for such a company, it's not so uncommon


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/howcheng

Better staplers than steamers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clawedinvader

I got it right, because that's what it said...but what does it mean? Apart from what you said.

Could it be:

Person 1: You're not using your phone to call your French friend are you?

Person 2: You used to call Europe.

Person 1: On the home phone. Not on my mobile!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.Franchomme

Remember that Europe used to be a name. ;-)

In ancient Greek mythology:

  • Europa was a Phoenician princess whom Zeus abducted after assuming the form of a dazzling white bull. He took her to the island of Crete where she gave birth to Minos, Rhadamanthus, and Sarpedon.

For more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europe

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max421833

yeah, well that was before Brexit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IforGot2

This sentence implies an ongoing act, correct? You used to call and still do? Vs llamo' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Not "and still do", but ongoing in the past. This happened more than once. You were regularly calling back then.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sousquark

Old post, I know, but you don't call Antarctica like you would any other country. If you want to call Esperanza base, their number is +54 810-222-0770 - 54 is the country code for Argentina since they own the station.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Timo920316

❤❤❤❤ you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ntwebinger

Maybe you are the president of America and you used to call the president of Europe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ntwebinger

If Europe is ruled by a president i never really prayed attention to that kinda stuff in school


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/herekittykitty99

I put "you used to call to europe", assuming that you used to call someone who lives there and not europe itself; in all probabiliy the statement was referring to the phone service or what-not. Got it wrong. Is that just the way they say it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lizsrbeny

I said "you called Europe" instead of "used to call". Why is this wrong? We don't have an imperfect tense in English, it's just based on context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharkfin

"used to call" is the English form. Also, "would call" - although this can overlap with the conditional.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lizsrbeny

What about "you called Europe every week" or "Last year, you always called Europe." Or, "When I was young, I would read a book while you called Europe."? I think it depends too much on context to say it must always translate to "used to call"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khristafer

The simple past is now accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/happyhealt

"You called to europe" was accepted. They were too picky as usual "You called Europe" is basically the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dansowten

Usted me llamaba en mi celular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcosGonz439044

Maybe they knew the band and had to call them frequently to give them "the final countdown" Cue synth refrain


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

I'll leave this here !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrcmnstr

Why do we use the personal "a" here? We don't know Europe personally. I feel like I'm missing somethi.g.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom873317

Llamar just takes "a" as a preposition


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JudieElisabeth

I also said "to Europe" and got it wrong. It would be a more literal translation since it has the "a" in Spanish. It would also be the correct way to say it in English. July 2014


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/efaryna

"You were calling to Europe." was accepted 29 May 2016


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ekihoo

"... to Europe"; not accepted 17.7.2017. The 'correct solution': "... to call Europe", which gives me creeps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fred792902

but not now March 2019. it should be ok as is imperfect past.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pigslew

I expect plenty of us did that. I'm querying it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew_Bowden

I agree you don't usually 'call europe' you would place a call 'to europe'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiriathaim

I translated "...call to.." from "..llamaba a..". What does the "a" in the sentence refer to if not "to"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gz7g6b

My question as well. occurs quite a bit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Some verbs just require prepositions and it is often not the same in English with another language. We also say "call up" as well as "call to" and just "call", but "call up" is less used and "call" is the most used in English. You just have to remember that in Spanish the verb requires "a". There won't alway be the same preposition or any preposition when translating back and forth.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donte93

Sometimes you can't take these sentences literally they are just used in order to use what you have learned


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KobesCameron

Shouldn't it be "llamabas"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom873317

Usted conjugates like third person singular. Tú llamabas, pero Usted llamaba.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philallthethings

Drake: Usted me llamaba en mi celular


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DukeDoon

Well Europe didn't call me back... so...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crsportsguy

Hello....its me Hello from the other side Must have called 1000 times To tell you i'm sorry for everything that i've done But when i call you never seem to be home.

Where you at Europe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fernandoarg

La traducción es incorrecta. ''You used to call Europe'' en español se traduce como ''Usted solía llamar a Europa''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeredithNa

Reporting "you rang Europe"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

Yes, this is what I was looking for.

I would also translate this as "you rang/ used to ring Europe" but it is still not accepted, Oct 2016.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wontlookdown

You used to call to Europe, late night when you needed Kluff.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thorklak

Why do the other sentences in this module translate to the the direct past tense in English (e.g., called, knew, ate) and alternatively the "used to" form, but this sentence does not accept "called" just the "used to call" form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eloplop2

I don't understand why "I phoned to Europe" is wrong...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom873317

If it were just "llamaba a europa", then sure. But what part would Usted play in that translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eloplop2

O.o You're right! Mekes no sense xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dare3966

Am I the only one who wrote "use to call" instead of "used to call."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adriano732737

No, but I managed to avoid doing so this time. I often make this mistake, stating "use" instead of "used" AND visa versa when writing. This is probably because when i listen to myself saying ´to use´ in a sentence i cannot tell whether I am vocalising "use" or "used" . This is one instance where "used to use" comes in handy for elocution practice.

I recently heard an African president speaking at the UN and every past tense verb was "...us-ed", "overcome -ed", "feed-ed" ...perfectly understandable but ungrammatical and clunky English .

"you used to call to europe" was not accepted. DL does not like "to Europe" . Rightly so according to the many comments indicating the correct grammatical usage of "llamar".

No worries! The "to" is in any case redundant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmrauch

I still don't understand why "a" is coming before Europa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukasJ93

Maybe "call TO Europe"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Klaus650857

I thought we had a thing going, but then she hooked up with a god turned into a bull or something and won't return my calls...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleDSpanish

I thought the whole point of the past imperfect was to differentiate between things like "you called Europe" and "you used to call Europe"? I entered "you called Europe" into the answer here and it said it was correct when I don't think it should have been.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrendanHal6

It was the final countdown


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jphagen

Microphone doesn´t work with this question


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vin273616

Does somebody live in Europe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tuti462554

The correct translation for "you used to call Europa" is "solías llamar a Europa". For "usted llamaba a Europa" will be "you were calling Europa" or "you called Europa"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SWilliamsJD

Why is "I used to call to Europe" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrandonD15

"You called Europe." accepted 09-22-17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joelrathfon

Simple past should be accepted also


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ekihoo

Since there is no operator called Europe, and I could call any European country I think that there has something gone 'haywired'...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stewart582448

You were calling Europe. I don't understand why this is wrong

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