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"The ducks are wounded."

Translation:Los patos están heridos.

1
5 years ago

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nik_rao

Why is the Estar form (están) used in this sentence while the Ser form (fueron) was used in the sentence " Los hombres fueron heridos" ?

48
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricrog
ricrog
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'estan heridos' describes the state of the ducks, ie the ducks were in a wounded condition. 'fueron heridos' is the PASSIVE construction describing the event that caused the wounding, it's another way of saying 'someone wounded the soldiers' (Perhaps wounded ducks getting their own back!!!)

36
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thefifthjudge
thefifthjudge
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Can the adjective "herido" be used to describe an emotional hurt as well?

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lupeeloo

That still doesn't explain why we make a difference between los patos and los hombres.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Ricrog's not saying that - you can use patos or hombres in both if you like. The difference is between describing their current state (they are wounded, están heridos) and a past event described in the passive voice (they were wounded by someone or something, fueron heridos)

So they're saying two different things, they're different constructions - it's not about ducks vs dudes
http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/courses/PASSIVE.HTM

24
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lupeeloo

I'm just saying why is it assumed that we want to say different things about the two parties/

-3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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I don't really get what you mean. Están heridos means they are wounded (current state), estuvieron herdios means they were wounded (past state), and fueron heridos means they were wounded (past event).

Those are different meanings and any of them could come up (including in Duolingo's sentences). There's an ambiguity there in English that Spanish avoids with the two 'be' verbs, and 'were wounded' should be accepted as either possibility in Spanish unless there's some more context.

But why would some sentence about ducks have to say the same thing as another sentence about hombres? They're different sentences with different meanings, one just happens to use noun X and the other noun Y

10
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielinform

How about:

"Los patos se lesionan."

Is this also correct?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fercalt

No because by using "se" you change the meaning of the sentence by the ducks are getting hurt

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kenaxo
kenaxo
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Good question. However, one difference is the time.

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abykale
Abykale
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To expand on what kenaxo said, In the present tense ser always means a quality that something has. But in the preterite (the past tense covered so far; Spanish has two!) for some reason it can be used for things that happened once. Actually, that's just like how it functions in English -- the men are wounded means it's a condition they're in, whereas to say the men were wounded in a particular incident is to speak of a particular moment.

8
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricrog
ricrog
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This is not quite true, how about: "After the battle, half the soldiers were dead and the rest were wounded(estaban heridos)" - past tense describing condition not particular moment. And: "Soldiers are wounded(son heridos) in battles sometimes" - present tense describing particular moment not condition, this is the 'passive' construction. :)

8
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/culluc

muchas gracias por su explicacion

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dkurzka

Pobres patos! :(

31
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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patos contra gatos :(

16
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hayder.Jabbar

Jajajaja

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim294818

?esta hahaha en espanol?

(Did I question it correctly?)

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michaelmsteven

awww

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaspet

Why not "Los patos son heridos"?

10
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michaelmsteven

being injured is a temporary condition, not a characteristic, so you use 'estar'

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Speedyfast
Speedyfast
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If it were that, then it would mean that they are like scarred for life.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stevecass67

Isn't ser vs estar here just a sense or context thing rather than an error? "Los patos están heridos" would mean the ducks are hurt / injured now - i.e. it's a description of their state, whereas it would be OK to say "los patos son heridos" if the surrounding context were a passive sentence - so something like "The ducks are [habitually] injured" maybe like "the ducks are hurt in the process of making food" It's not absolutely clear from a single sentence which is meant.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lusyomo

Lastimado mean wounded?

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AutumnAkin1
AutumnAkin1
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I thought so

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fercalt

Yed

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WordJigsaw
WordJigsaw
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Whoops... herVidos not meaning quite the same thing! Poor ducks...

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/compicej

Hahaha. :p

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liz100637

I agree stevecass this is a contextual argument and it should not be marked incorrect since there isn't enough to infer what they wanted us to, evidently.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lupeeloo

Muchisimas gracias, finalmente!

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joycemelton
joycemelton
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I think it would have been funnier if one of the options had been "Pero los gansos están cocinado." :) It was the first thing I thought of when I saw "The ducks are wounded" (but the geese are cooked).

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jagmicker

CAVEAT: re: my earlier comment - I guess it's true that even a permanent injury is temporary; after all one day we will ALL no longer be injured, we will be dead! :-P

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kartar_Singh

i wrote LAS PATAS ESTÁN HERIDAS and it says wring.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Ducks are los patos (masculine)

Las patas are something else: http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/pata -- forelegs/hindlegs of an animal.

I'm also not sure if they want you to write in ALL CAPS

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee29724
Dee29724
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Ok i have to ask... what if they are female ducks? And is there another name for drakes in spanish?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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La pata is a female duck, see http://lema.rae.es/drae/srv/search?val=pata

3. f. Hembra del pato (‖ ave palmípeda). (hembra means female animal)

So yeah it should be fine, report it! And 'drake' just means 'male duck' which is already wrapped up in the pato/pata thing - you could say pato macho or pata hembra if you need to make it clear

3
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee29724
Dee29724
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Aha! Muchas gracias :) and an extra thank you for the explanation in brackets. While my Spanish is much better than it was a few months ago when I started DL, I still have a long way to go before most of that link makes any sense! A lingot for your generosity...

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Haha yeah, I just wanted to give you the info from the source! That's the dictionary for the Real Academia Española, they're like the official language authority - so you can't get much more definitive than that

1
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kartar_Singh

Gracias

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AutumnAkin1
AutumnAkin1
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Why not say estan danados? Sorry don't know how to do tilde on my phone.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1gnaci0
1gnaci0
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I agree with you (i am a native speaker). Also "Los patos están lastimados" should be accepted

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaythefifth

That is what i thought too.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PoetryOtter

Darn, I never seem to get ser and estar correct. :'(

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CjZ3wl
CjZ3wl
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Why estan insted of son

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thefifthjudge
thefifthjudge
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We use the verb estar here because we are describing a condition of the ducks; we would use ser if the wounds were an essential characteristic of the ducks.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dylan_Sosa

how sad

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ana668249

So sad :(

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jbeartx

I agree, the context makes it ambiguous. Imagine the statement of a play-by-play announcer - ( after an action) "The ducks are wounded"

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamieSeagu

I tried this sentence a different way assuming the ducks were all female -- "Las patas están heridas" -- but it wasn't accepted. Are there one or more problems with this, or should it be accepted?

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KLTah
KLTah
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this application is past participle used as an adjective correct?

0
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KLTah
KLTah
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what is the usage of the participle here? is it in the passive construction?

0
Reply2 months ago