Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

https://www.duolingo.com/dincxjo

Latin American vs European Spanish

dincxjo
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 400

Sorry if this has been posted before - but I'm just wondering what version of the language is used in the Spanish course. The logo appears to be a Spanish flag, but a lot of the audio seems to be Latin American pronunciation.

I'm wanting to learn European Spanish - will there be much of a difference in this course? Are there plans to have European Spanish audio in the future?

Thanks for any information guys!

4 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ForgedbyHistoria

It's Latin American Spanish (which also has variations within that region). There's no use of "os" or "vosotros" in the lessons here. The Spanish here is pretty much standard Spanish which means you'll be understood anywhere you go. Even in Spain there are different dialects and not everyone speaks Castilian. I doubt there will be European Spanish audio here but there are other places you can go.

If you want to acquire a more "Spanish sounding accent" you should just watch some movies, documentaries, news reports, podcasts, etc., from Spain and try to imitate their mannerisms, but I'd be very careful with that. Happy studies friend.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizabethelzby

Some resources that you can look at for European Spanish are the podcasts "Notes in Spanish" and "Lightspeed Spanish" (Lightspeed Spanish also has a youtube Spanish). The podcasts are free- you can pay for transcripts of the podcasts if you want them (I highly recommend this, as they are very useful and have exercises).
You can also look at Assimil's Spanish with Ease and Using Spanish. The books aren't expensive but the audio tends to be expensive. You can check sites like Amazon, Ebay, etc. to find used copies for less. The Assimil books use European Spanish, and they also have a section in the back that introduces the differences between European Spanish and Latin American Spanish. SpanishPod101.com also has some podcasts that use European Spanish. You can make a free account, and you can just listen to the main lessons. You can pay if you want access to the review tracks, transcripts and worksheets (I think if you buy a year's membership it is like $5-$6 a month). They also have a youtube channel. These are just some of the resources that I have used, and maybe you can find some of them helpful.

Like someone said above, the main difference is in slang, the use of vosotros/os, and the pronunciation of the ceceo (z and ce, ci are pronounced as a kind of soft th, whereas in Latin America they are pronounced as an s). Also, the j in European Spanish can be stronger- kind of similar to the "ch" sound in German or the Scottish sound in "loch."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StefanoSolgreno
StefanoSolgreno
  • 20
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6

American English and Latin-American Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DonnaLauv
DonnaLauv
  • 10
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3

It's definitely standardized Latin American Spanish. The kind of Spanish you can hear on CNN espaniol. To be honest, I don't see that much difference between European Spanish and Latin American Spanish just some pronunciation differences that you can get used to easily. And actually even Latin American Spanish accents vary greatly as well depending on the country (even a region in a country). Dominican accent and Colombian accent for example are very different.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kalendulas

I wonder if rules from Spanish in Spain (RAE) are the ones taking for reference in Latin America, I´ve seen some endings of words in Argentinian for example that would go against RAE rules. Still they may also be slang in Argentina and not be accepted. If they are, and this happens in every single country in Latin America, and one has to learn all different rules I would find it more "economic" to study Spanish from Spain. We have different accents but follow just one single rule. On the other hand, and this is a personal impression which comes from my own experience, appart from the fonetics (that would be another huge topic to talk about) I found a more rich Spanish in countries like Argentina, Chile, Perú or Mexico than Spain itself, in the fact that they tend to use a wider range of vocabulary than general local people do in Spain. I found very little people, very very little, specially just cultured ones in Spain that make the proper effort to really use the richness of our language.

Here I have read people placing latin American Spanish like an inferior version of the one from Spain...a pitty (and I´m from Spain, but I´ve seen the lack of respect to my own language when it comes to the speakers in everyday life). If I was learning Spanish and had to choose a partner to practise I would go for a latin one, taking always into account the fonetic changes and the fact that sometimes latin american make slight written mistakes regarding the use of "c" instead of "s" and viceversa.

4 years ago